I Possessori del debito pubblico italiano sono di fronte a un bivio ma con 2 strade che conducono entrambe a un precipizio, meglio valutare un’uscita di emergenza

I Possessori del debito pubblico italiano sono di fronte a un bivio ma con 2 strade che conducono entrambe a un precipizio, meglio valutare un’uscita di emergenza

Il BTP decennale rende oggi il 2,5% e domani???

Riguardate questo video esemplare che spiega il legame tra tasso di interesse e prezzo di un’obbligazione

1) INFLATIONARY MODE: probabilità non pervenuta, le conseguenze se la BCE riporta l’inflazione al 2% , tutti i bonds di cui sopra crollano…… di quanto? A parità di altre condizioni e con un approccio evangelico, con inflazione in aumento dell’1% dovrebbero salire i rendimenti in pari misura e conseguentemente i BTP già emessi perderanno circa la stessa percentuale in valore per ogni anno mancante alla scadenza.

2) DFLATIONARY MODE: probabilità non pervenuta, le conseguenze se la BCE non riporta su l’inflazione (e un poco anche la crescita), i paesi come l’Italia devono tagliare il debito con qualche default parziale…… perchè? Per avere un debito sostenibile il Pil nominale (e con inflazione vicina allo zero o in deflazione fate voi) deve aumentare di una % simile al costo del debito, quindi il 2,5% del BTP di oggi ma che in realtà e oltre il 4% essendo il costo del debito italiano legato ad emissioni precedenti più costose

Fate bene i conti e valutate con MALTAway la vera alternativa, investendo nel mercato immobiliare a Malta, con un mercato guidato da una domanda sostenuta, differenziata e in costante crescita e con un rendimento in conto capitale o da affitto da far sfigurare gran parte del mercato obbligazionario

http://maltaway.wordpress.com/2014/09/08/bolla-dei-bond-e-mercato-immobiliare-a-malta-memorizzare-nella-pietra/

http://maltaway.wordpress.com/2014/10/06/litalia-e-un-problema-per-leuropa-ma-soprattutto-per-i-suoi-cittadini-italiani-e-per-chi-ha-sottoscritto-il-suo-debito-in-parte-le-2-cose-coincidono-maltaway-ti-aiuta-a-capire-le-alternati/

maltaway_btp_casa_malta

12 modi di dire Inglesi utili anche a Malta e che gli Americani non capiscono ( e gli Italiani ???)

Con MALTAway il tuo corso di inglese

12 modi di dire Inglesi utili anche a Malta e che gli Americani non capiscono ( e gli Italiani ???)

12 British Sayings That Americans Don’t Understand (and what’s about Italians ???)

For the Brits, an elevator is a “lift,”

an apartment is a “flat,”

and those chips you’re snacking on are actually called “crisps.”

And 12 British phrases that will leave Americans utterly flummoxed:

  1. “They lost the plot.”

When someone has “lost the plot,” it means they have lost their cool. It’s a common phrase in English football in particular, and is generally used when a player or coach gets in a fight or does a terrible job during the game.

  1. “I haven’t seen that in donkey’s years.”

“Donkey’s years” translates to “a really long time,” mainly because “donkey’s ears” kind of sounded like “donkey’s years” and became a rhyming slang term.

The phrase was underscored by the belief that donkeys live a long time (which can be true) and have very long ears (definitely true).

  1. “Quit your whinging!”

REUTERS/Eddie KeoghQuit your whinging — it’s always raining in London.

When someone is “whinging,” it means they’re whining or crying. The next time your coworker is complaining about something, feel free to call him a whinger.

  1. “He’s such a chav.”

This is a pejorative epithet in Britain that’s used to described a specific kind of stereotype: A working-class person who’s loud or brash and wears (usually fake) designer clothes — especially the classic Burberry check.

It’s essentially the British version of “white trash” and should be used sparingly.

  1. “You’ve thrown a spanner in the works.”

When you “put/throw a spanner in the works,” it means you’ve ruined a plan. A spanner is the word for a wrench in England, so it’s the British equivalent of “throwing a wrench in the works.”

  1. “Let’s have a chin-wag.”

Though fairly self-explanatory, having a “chinwag” (sometimes “chin-wag“) means that you’re having a brief chat with someone, usually associated with gossip. Just imagine a chin wagging up and down, and you’ll get the idea why.

  1. “I’m chuffed to bits.”

If you’re “chuffed to bits,” it means that you’re really happy or thrilled about something. It’s also acceptable to say “chuffed” all on its own: “I’ve just scored free tickets to the Beyoncé concert, and I’m well chuffed!”

  1. “That’s manky.”

Something that is “manky” is unpleasantly dirty or disgusting. Its slang usage dates back to the 1950s, and was probably a combination of “mank” (meaning mutilated or maimed), the Old French word “manqué” (to fail), and the Latin “mancus” (maimed). 

You can also feel “manky” if you’re under the weather.

  1. “My cat? She’s a moggy.”

REUTERS/Shamil ZhumatovThis moggy is quite patriotic.

A “moggy” or “moggie” refers to an alley cat or a cat without a pedigree, but is often used interchangeably as another word for “cat.”

10.   “This was an absolute doddle to do.”

Something that’s a “doddle” is a task or activity that’s extremely easy. Though the origin is unknown, it dates back to the 1930s and is still common today.

11.   “You’re taking the piss.”

When you “take the piss” with someone, that means that you’re being unreasonable or taking liberties. For example, if a cashier overcharges you on something, he is taking the piss.

It can also be a stand-in phrase for when you’re mocking or teasing someone, though this is more commonly said as “taking the piss out of” someone or something. For example: “They’re always taking the piss out of John because he likes Taylor Swift.”

12.   “I’ve dropped a clanger.”

When someone makes an embarrassing gaffe that upsets someone else, they’ve “dropped a clanger.”

For example, if you offer your seat to a pregnant woman on the subway and she tells you that she’s not actually pregnant, you may have dropped a clanger.

http://www.businessinsider.com/british-sayings-and-what-they-mean-2014-11

maltaway_balattiboardmember_union-jack-boots

Uno sguardo all’andamento in Borsa dei titoli INTERNET leader, nel loro primo anno di quotazione

Uno sguardo con MALTAway all’andamento in Borsa dei titoli INTERNET leader – Pandora, Yelp, Facebook, Twitter e LinkedIn , nel loro primo anno di quotazione

https://albertobalatti.wordpress.com/2014/11/10/stock-milestones-of-internet-companies-in-their-first-years-on-the-market/

bii sai cotd internet stock performance

Are Simpler Stock Strategies Better?

Are Simpler Stock Strategies Better?

Does a screening strategy with fewer criteria perform better than one with many criteria?

Only one High Score/Criteria screen fared as well as a screen that simply seeks non-financial stocks with low ratios of EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) to TEV (total enterprise value).

http://www.econmatters.com/2014/11/are-simpler-stock-strategies-better.html

Stock Milestones Of Internet Companies In Their First Years On The Market

It’d be interesting to look at how internet companies like Twitter have fared on the stock market on the first anniversary of their IPOs. Here, you can see the respective stock price milestones of Pandora, Yelp, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn in their first years on the stock market.

http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-twitter-stock-twtr-first-year-comparison-2014-11

bii sai cotd internet stock performance

12 British Sayings That Americans Don’t Understand

12 British Sayings That Americans Don’t Understand (and what’s about Italians ???)

For the Brits, an elevator is a “lift,”

an apartment is a “flat,”

and those chips you’re snacking on are actually called “crisps.”

And 12 British phrases that will leave Americans utterly flummoxed:

  1. “They lost the plot.”

When someone has “lost the plot,” it means they have lost their cool. It’s a common phrase in English football in particular, and is generally used when a player or coach gets in a fight or does a terrible job during the game.

  1. “I haven’t seen that in donkey’s years.”

“Donkey’s years” translates to “a really long time,” mainly because “donkey’s ears” kind of sounded like “donkey’s years” and became a rhyming slang term.

The phrase was underscored by the belief that donkeys live a long time (which can be true) and have very long ears (definitely true).

  1. “Quit your whinging!”

REUTERS/Eddie KeoghQuit your whinging — it’s always raining in London.

When someone is “whinging,” it means they’re whining or crying. The next time your coworker is complaining about something, feel free to call him a whinger.

  1. “He’s such a chav.”

This is a pejorative epithet in Britain that’s used to described a specific kind of stereotype: A working-class person who’s loud or brash and wears (usually fake) designer clothes — especially the classic Burberry check.

It’s essentially the British version of “white trash” and should be used sparingly.

  1. “You’ve thrown a spanner in the works.”

When you “put/throw a spanner in the works,” it means you’ve ruined a plan. A spanner is the word for a wrench in England, so it’s the British equivalent of “throwing a wrench in the works.”

  1. “Let’s have a chin-wag.”

Though fairly self-explanatory, having a “chinwag” (sometimes “chin-wag“) means that you’re having a brief chat with someone, usually associated with gossip. Just imagine a chin wagging up and down, and you’ll get the idea why.

  1. “I’m chuffed to bits.”

If you’re “chuffed to bits,” it means that you’re really happy or thrilled about something. It’s also acceptable to say “chuffed” all on its own: “I’ve just scored free tickets to the Beyoncé concert, and I’m well chuffed!”

  1. “That’s manky.”

Something that is “manky” is unpleasantly dirty or disgusting. Its slang usage dates back to the 1950s, and was probably a combination of “mank” (meaning mutilated or maimed), the Old French word “manqué” (to fail), and the Latin “mancus” (maimed). 

You can also feel “manky” if you’re under the weather.

  1. “My cat? She’s a moggy.”

REUTERS/Shamil ZhumatovThis moggy is quite patriotic.

A “moggy” or “moggie” refers to an alley cat or a cat without a pedigree, but is often used interchangeably as another word for “cat.”

10. “This was an absolute doddle to do.”

Something that’s a “doddle” is a task or activity that’s extremely easy. Though the origin is unknown, it dates back to the 1930s and is still common today.

11. “You’re taking the piss.”

When you “take the piss” with someone, that means that you’re being unreasonable or taking liberties. For example, if a cashier overcharges you on something, he is taking the piss.

It can also be a stand-in phrase for when you’re mocking or teasing someone, though this is more commonly said as “taking the piss out of” someone or something. For example: “They’re always taking the piss out of John because he likes Taylor Swift.”

12. “I’ve dropped a clanger.”

When someone makes an embarrassing gaffe that upsets someone else, they’ve “dropped a clanger.”

For example, if you offer your seat to a pregnant woman on the subway and she tells you that she’s not actually pregnant, you may have dropped a clanger.

http://www.businessinsider.com/british-sayings-and-what-they-mean-2014-11

maltaway_balattiboardmember_union-jack-boots