Le 18 cose che ho imparato veleggiando a MALTA

18 Things I Learnt Sailing In Malta

Le 18 cose che ho imparato veleggiando a MALTA

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Getting ready for a sailing trip? I mean: Who wouldn’t want to sail some turquoise waters on a yacht for a week, right?

Whether you are about to embark on the trip of a lifetime or simply gathering some inspiration for upcoming adventures, have a look to these tips.

I guarantee you they will come in handy sooner or later!

 

  • PACK LIGHT, TRAVEL FAR.

A very basic rule for having fun traveling. The less you pack for a trip like this, the more free and liberated you will feel in your cabin and, therefore, the happier you will be!

 

  • SCHEDULES ARE SET BY DAYLIGHT. AND YOUR SKIPPER.

Enough said.

 

  • RESPECT EVERYTHING AND EVERYBODY.

And you will feel at home. Simple.

 

  • EMBRACE OPPORTUNITIES.

If the sun is shining right now and you feel like swimming, just do it! There might be no other chances later on. Same applies for fishing. If you are into that, just set your line and wait for the fish to come your way.

 

  • PLAN YOUR SIMPLE MEALS IN ADVANCE.

The solely fact of having limited storage room for groceries or a small kitchen area shouldn’t stop your creativity. You can create the most nutritious and yummy meals with just a handful of ingredients!

 

  • KNOW YOUR LIMITS.

You might be an adrenaline junkie or the most balanced person on earth but, here is a very important thing, being seasick is also that can happen to anybody, anytime. Even seasoned skippers and experienced sailors get seasick sometimes so there are some chances it will happen to you too. What takes us to the next point.

 

  • PACK BIODRAMINA.

Chew some biodramina chicle or gum 20 minutes before departure. And carefully pack also your medicines. There is not such thing as overseas pharmacies.

 

  • MIND YOUR BELONGINGS.

Bring everything you will most likely need outside. Sunglasses, towel, swimming costume, sweater, cellphone, camera, coffee and snacks. Going up and down to grab stuff if you tend to feel seasick is not fun.

 

  • MODERATION. MODERATION. MODERATION.

Moderate your eating. And drinking. Overdoing one or both is dangerous and, therefore, unacceptable in the middle of the sea, where there is enough to take care of already without needing extra worries.

 

  • KEEP YOURSELF HYDRATED.

Take enough drinkable water on board. And drink it.

 

  • GET READY FOR UNSTABLE CONDITIONS.

Such as getting wet, dealing with extreme winds, lacking mobile network, postponing your meals.. sea conditions will determine your life rhythm once again

 

  • KEEP YOUR SHIT TOGETHER.

Your cabin tidy and clean, and your gadgets safe. And this also applies for common areas like indoors and outdoors living space, kitchen and bathrooms. A boat in the water is always moving. Sometimes very smoothly, so much you could fall asleep like a baby in a berth. Some others so much that you will start wondering what are the chances of the whole thing capsizing.

 

  • SHARING IS CARING.

Pay extra care to what is needed around you and, if you can help someone, go the extra mile for that. You are sharing a limited space and you might need something tomorrow as well.

 

  • DO NOT BE THE SMARTEST GUY IN THE CLASSROOM.

Unless you are experienced in sailing, trust me, you have no idea of what you are getting into. Listen to the one who knows and is leading, the skipper is your friend! And follow the given instructions. There will be many times when you will be able to make decisions. But some others you will just have to follow orders. Safety is always first.

 

  • PRESERVE YOUR RESOURCES.

Water and electricity overall. But also food, clean clothes, energy. Plan the use of your devices in advance if possible. Once you leave the port you are unplugged. Only small devices like cellphones should be charged then using an emergency plugin. Laptops, cameras, hair dryers and more. Embrace the fact that you are experiencing something different than your average day if that is the case, and once again plan accordingly.

 

  • BE PATIENT AND YOU WILL BE REWARDED.

Accept uncertainty and lower your expectations.

 

  • DRESS THE PART.

It is very difficult to look awesome like you would in any other occasion… unless you go with the flow and accept where you are. Specially if you are a girl, choose comfortable outfits, little to no jewelry and, if you have curly hair you can also leave the straightener home. It is useless.

 

  • GET READY TO LEAVE.

Once you finally feel comfortable sailing, the sea sickness has abandon you days ago and you start thinking about actually moving to a boat, get ready to get land sickness. It does not last long, but it actually is a thing. Everything around you moves and you could feel like you are drunk. Luckily, this only last a few mins.

 

BONUS TIP!
If you are ready to give it a go, choose your destination wisely. For beginners, I’d definitely recommend Malta. This European archipelago has the perfect size to fall head over heels for sailing with all the commodities you could wish for and keeping always a short distance to the shore so you’ll be able to enjoy everything the country has to offer.

http://www.traveldudes.org/travel-tips/18-things-i-learnt-sailing-malta/64455

Freelancing Around the World

Freelancing Around the World

There are many types of freelancing work arrangements around the world.  For example, “casual engagement” contracts used in Australia and Singapore, “zero-hour” contracts in the UK, “work on request” or “job on call” arrangements used in Germany, Sweden, and Italy.

As in the U.S., young people overseas, and in particular graduates who are struggling to find full-time employment, resort to casual working arrangements, as they are faced with no other viable option.

Let’s look at how the freelance system works in a few countries:

The UK Experience

Zero-hour contracts are contracts where someone may be asked to work at any time, but is only paid for the hours actually worked. At the same time, the company is under no obligation to provide work or indicate the number of hours for which the worker will be required to work.

These zero-hour contracts have been used in the UK for many years, however, their use has increased recently.  In 2012 approximately 250,000 people were signed up to zero-hour contracts.  As of 2013 that number had grown to an estimated 1,000,000 people.

In addition to a worker only being paid for the actual time worked, s/he is typically restricted from working for another company during any waiting period.   This requirement is called an “exclusivity clause” and is included in zero-hour contracts.

Because of this “exclusivity” there is uncertainty about whether zero-hour workers are classified in law as having “employee” or “worker” status. Individuals with “employee” status are provided with a number of important legal rights and benefits which workers are not.

The Sweden experience

Since the 1990s, the number of alternative working arrangements and in particular, the number of “on-call” contracts, have increased in Sweden due to greater economic uncertainty in the market.  In the past 10 years the use of on-call contracts more than tripled from 42,000 to 143,000.

As in the UK, it is not clear whether they are recognized under Swedish law, and exactly what their employment status is.  In Sweden, however, most benefits are provided by the government not by the employer. Whether working or not, workers receive full benefits and companies have few obligations.  This may be the reason why, in contrast to the general negativity towards zero-hour contracts in the UK, there is no stigma with “on-call” contracts here.

The German experience

In Germany, “work on request” arrangements allow workers to work for different companies at the same time.  However, if a worker’s contract prohibits him/her from working for other companies, or requires the worker to carry out specific work at a specific time, it indicates that the worker is personally and economically dependent on the company.  Therefore s/he is likely to be an employee rather than a worker.

Conclusion

Some European countries have tightly regulated alternative working arrangements. For example, in France, Germany and Spain, fixed-term employment contracts are only permitted under certain circumstances — a specific temporary task, the replacement of a temporarily absent employee, a temporary increase in workload or a seasonal job. Zero-hour contracts would not be legal since any employment contract (including temporary ones) must specify a minimum working time for each worker as well as pay.

http://www.compensationcafe.com/2015/08/freelancing-around-the-world.html