Are Simpler Stock Strategies Better?

Are Simpler Stock Strategies Better?

Does a screening strategy with fewer criteria perform better than one with many criteria?

Only one High Score/Criteria screen fared as well as a screen that simply seeks non-financial stocks with low ratios of EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) to TEV (total enterprise value).

http://www.econmatters.com/2014/11/are-simpler-stock-strategies-better.html

Is it Asset Location As Important As Asset Allocation ???

Choosing the location of where your investments are located can add significantly to your after tax returns. Most people understand that modern portfolio theory and asset allocation are major factors in determining investment returns but individuals are not as well versed in techniques of asset location

Focusing on after tax rates of returns, liquidity needs, and efficient allocation of your investment assets will allow investors to build a larger investment portfolio, reduce taxes, and earn higher after tax rates of returns.

http://investorsolutions.com/knowledge-center/investment-articles/asset-location-is-as-important-as-asset-allocation-3/

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Wealth without workers, workers without wealth The digital revolution is bringing sweeping change to labour markets in both rich and poor worlds

Wealth without workers, workers without wealth

The digital revolution is bringing sweeping change to labour markets in both rich and poor worlds

In the coming years the disruption will be felt by more people in more places, for three reasons. First, the rise of machine intelligence means more workers will see their jobs threatened. The effects will be felt further up the skill ladder, as auditors, radiologists and researchers of all sorts begin competing with machines. Technology will enable some doctors or professors to be much more productive, leaving others redundant.

Second, wealth creation in the digital era has so far generated little employment. Entrepreneurs can turn their ideas into firms with huge valuations and hardly any staff. Oculus VR, a maker of virtual-reality headsets with 75 employees, was bought by Facebook earlier this year for $2 billion. With fewer than 50,000 workers each, the giants of the modern tech economy such as Google and Facebook are a small fraction of the size of the 20th century’s industrial behemoths.

Third, these shifts are now evident in emerging economies. Foxconn, long the symbol of China’s manufacturing economy, at one point employed 1.5m workers to assemble electronics for Western markets. Now, as the costs of labour rise and those of automated manufacturing fall, Foxconn is swapping workers for robots. China’s future is more Alibaba than assembly line: the e-commerce company that recently made a spectacular debut on the New York Stock Exchange employs only 20,000 people.

The answer is not regulation or a larger state. High minimum wages will simply accelerate the replacement of workers by machines. Punitive tax rates will deter entrepreneurship and scare off the skilled on whom prosperity in the digital era depends. The best thing governments can do is to raise the productivity and employability of less-skilled workers. That means getting rid of daft rules that discourage hiring, like protections which make it difficult to sack poor performers. It means better housing policy and more investment in transport, to help people work in productive cities such as London and Mumbai.

http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21621800-digital-revolution-bringing-sweeping-change-labour-markets-both-rich-and-poor?fsrc=nlw%7Chig%7C2-10-2014%7C5356c450899249e1ccb3081a%7C

Have USA sw engineers a huge salary?

Have USA sw engineers a huge salary?

Data from the job-hunting site Glassdoor ( they only included companies in which at least 20 software engineers reported their salaries in the past two years)

The results are interesting: Being a software engineer (also called “programmer” or “software developer”) is a good paying job, no matter where you work. But even in the tech industry, software engineers are not, on average, getting outrageous paychecks. And one huge retailer, known for low wages, pays its developers surprisingly well.

  • GE, $80,235
  • Verizon, $86,859
  • Comcast, $91,984
  • IBM, $92,418
  • Samsung, $92,667
  • JPMorgan Chase, $95,270
  • Bank of America, $95,325
  • Amazon, $105,709
  • Intel, $106,234
  • Microsoft, $108,712
  • Oracle, $112,681
  • Facebook, $122,695
  • Walmart, $124,433
  • Apple, $125,695
  • Google, $127,827

http://www.businessinsider.com/software-salaries-at-big-companies-2014-9?op=1

What, exactly, do directors do?

Ioday, a good balance of “grounding” and “stargazing” is vital to preparing the organisation for the future. The board must look closely at the here and now, making sure everything is working correctly; otherwise we run the risk of missing signs of everything from neglect to malfeasance. We must also look into the next 10 to 15 years to make sure that the organisation has a robust future to look forward to.

Individual directors will increasingly find themselves being held to account for the choices that they have made in the boardroom in many areas, be it around executive compensation or “innovative” tax strategies.

https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140814031642-60894986-boardroom-101-what-exactly-do-directors-do?trk=object-title

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The sharing economy is a complicated concept but it changes the world. Everyone should be able to participate in the economy like a corporation, what the sharing economy really means is that now people in 60 seconds can be micro-entrepreneurs

The sharing economy is a complicated concept but it changes the world.

Everyone should be able to participate in the economy like a corporation, what the sharing economy really means is that now people in 60 seconds can be micro-entrepreneurs

The idea that Uber, Airbnb, TaskRabbit and countless others are running with is that anyone can contribute to society and make money doing it

http://www.businessinsider.com/airbnbs-ceo-explains-company-stephen-colbert-sharing-economy-2014-8

 

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