Bicycles, mobility, and the future of cities

Bicycles mobility and the future of cities

Just a bike for a better world, for a better governance, in Malta as well

“No single raindrop ever feels like it is responsible for the flood.”
This old & futuristic machine kills fascists, fat, and bankers
A Governance based on bikes…..

maltaway beach bike

In an interview, Jay Walder of Motivate discusses how new services and technology are changing how city residents are getting around.

Jay Walder is the president and CEO of Motivate, a bike-sharing company with operations in 11 locations. Before starting Motivate, Walder was CEO of Hong Kong’s Mass Transit Railway Corporation and also chairman and CEO of New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). He has also worked with Transport for London. He spoke with Simon London, McKinsey’s director of digital communications.

McKinsey: What are the big trends in urban mobility?

Jay Walder: You have to start by asking, “What’s happening in cities?” They’re denser and more complex than ever before. Traditional travel patterns are being blown away, and that’s pushing us away from some traditional models. In New York, for example, we’ve seen a phenomenal shift downtown since 9/11, with the area becoming as residential as business. The far west side of Manhattan is becoming a combination of residential and office space. We’re seeing the development of technology hubs across the river in Brooklyn and Queens. You see such changes in many, many other cities as well. It’s not the same consolidation and centralization we saw before.

McKinsey: So what does that mean for planners, builders, and infrastructure?

Jay Walder: It’s harder. The traditional model of public transit is to get a lot of people into a vehicle that’s going to one place at one time, on a set schedule, and according to a pattern. Today, though, we’re used to things being on demand. So developing around the traditional urban infrastructure are a whole variety of nontraditional means of mobility, such as car sharing and bike sharing. In what I’ll call the Mad Men days of commuting, you commuted to work one way, and you went back the same way, and the pattern was very symmetrical. Now travel is becoming asymmetrical. You take a whole series of different modes across the day—a train, a bus, an Uber ride, bike share, walking, a ferry.

maltaway cycling malta

McKinsey: Which emerging technologies are most likely to be transformative?

Jay Walder: Bike sharing is actually one of the most revolutionary changes that we’ve seen within the urban transportation space. It’s redefined our idea of what public transit should be. Bike sharing creates a system for personal mobility. It is personalized mass transit. You distance yourself from the idea of stations and routes and schedules. Uber and Lyft in many ways reflect that, too, and there is great potential for autonomous vehicles. There are many challenges associated with this shift—technological, social, regulatory. But you can see them as the enablers of tremendous change in the city.

http://www.maltaway.com/malta-cycling-sport-professionals-people/

http://www.maltaway.com/just-a-bike-for-a-better-world-for-a-better-governance-in-malta-as-well/

http://www.maltaway.com/urban-residents-shouldnt-buy-cars-its-both-shockingly-expensive-and-completely-unnecessary-urban-maltese-this-is-for-you/

MALTA, Gozo MTB ride video

That’s MALTA way style … with MTB…ikers as well

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www.maltaway.com is bicycles way as well
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Just a bike for a better world, for a better governance, in Malta as well

Just a bike for a better world, for a better governance, in Malta as well

“No single raindrop ever feels like it is responsible for the flood.”

This old & futuristic machine kills fascists, fat, and bankers

A Governance based on bikes…..

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The bicycle is an amazing piece of technology that is capable of solving at least a few of our modern day health, environmental, and energy problems. Consider that in many parts of the world where bicycles are the norm there is usually far less obesity, debt, and reliance on imported oil and the big offensive military that is required to invade nations and murder the people so we may take their oil.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-11-06/machine-kills-fat-fascist-bankers

“No single raindrop ever feels like it is responsible for the flood.”

bike_ride_woman

 Speaking of raindrops, one of my favorite movies of all time is Butch Cassidy and The Sundance KidThe bicycle scene with Butch and Etta is unforgettable.  Like many, I grew up riding a bike.  I learned at a young age how to fix a flat and put on the chain.  I loved the freedom of riding around town.  My first stitches, five in the chin, were earned in a bike wreck that was caused by me.  Consequences are such a powerful thing.

Sadly, kids these days tend to text their friends, or chat virtually inside an x-box game, rather than ride over to each other’s home.

The bicycle is an amazing piece of technology that is capable of solving at least a few of our modern day health, financial, and energy problems.  Consider that in many parts of the world where bicycles are the norm there is usually far less obesity, debt, and reliance on imported oil and the offensive war machine that is required to invade nations and murder people so that we may take their oil.

Bicycles are elegant…

Bicycles are efficient…

Bicycles are effective…

When widely adopted, bicycles can have a big effect on a population.

While Europe is getting fatter, the Netherlands is getting thinner. It’s the only country in which the World Health Organization (WHO) is predicting a decline in obesity rates.

One reason, possibly the main reason, the Dutch are not getting more obese is bicycles:

In the Netherlands 27% of all trips and 25% of trips to work are made by bike. The average distance cycled per person per day is 2.5 km. Holland and bicycles go together like bread and jam. Despite the recession the cycle-happy Dutch are still spending a lot of money on their bicycles – nearly 1 billion euros’ worth a year. About 1.3 million bicycles were sold in the Netherlands in 2009, at an average price of 713 euros ($1,008) each. Amsterdam (the capital and largest city of the Netherlands) is one of the most bicycle-friendly large cities in the world. It has 400 km of bike lanes and nearly 40% of all commutes in Amsterdam are done on bike.

For comparison:

In the USA only 0.9% of all trips are made by bike. The average distance cycled per person is 0.1 km.

Minneapolis, San Francisco, Portland, Denver, and Boston are consistently ranked among the top bicycle cities in the USA.  You will not find one of these five cities among the 25 fattest cities in the USA.  Houston is the fattest city in the USA, is also probably the very worst for bicycles, and was ranked second by county for gasoline consumption, just behind Los Angeles.

The economics are obvious:

How do average people afford a $33,560 car when they make $28,031 in a year?  Debt, of course!

Through early September, Wall Street firms issued nearly $70 billion in securities backed by auto loans, up 9% from the same period a year ago, according to J.P. Morgan. About $21 billion of those were backed by subprime loans to relatively risky borrowers.

Subprime car-loan originations have taken off in recent years as lenders have loosened underwriting criteria in this sector, allowing for borrowers with low, and often no, credit scores to get access to financing. During the first half of 2015, lenders gave out $56.4 billion in subprime auto loans, up 13% from the same period a year ago and up 181% from the first half of 2009, when the market for these loans bottomed out, according to credit-reporting firm Equifax Inc.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-10-22/auto-loan-market-reminds-me-wha…

In contrast, I recently bought this folding bike for less than $300.  It was made in China, which I now regret, but if you are willing to spend more than $1,000, then you can get one made in the USA.  They easily fold up in about 10 seconds to put it in the back of a car, carry it on a train, throw it in the storage under a bus, or take it up the elevator to an apartment or office.  No gasoline expense.  No insurance expense.  No parking expense.

So, if you are are sick from being overweight, tired of bombing brown people to steal their oil, and want to know something you can do about it, TODAY , that will also improve your personal financial situation, then ditch the car and ride a bike.  You will feel better, and better about yourself, and remember, no single raindrop ever feels like it is responsible for the flood.

Go Dutch!

Be well!

Peace!

You could be interested to read this article too

http://www.bikingexpert.com/75-most-bike-friendly-cities-in-the-world/