Will EU student visa status change following Brexit?

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No immediate change’ to EU student visa policy after Brexit

Universities Minister, Jo Johnson has made a statement about the status of international students in the UK from the EU following Brexit.

Malta is already, Brexit or NO Brexit, a great alternative for English Courses and Higher Education and MBA courses as well, and without any Visa for the EU student

Moreover for a EU students, the advantages, in case of Brexit, will enlarge significantly on Visa, fees and funding size

We have a valid Education offer here in Malta with many English courses and MBA, contact us for any query

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Students from the EU currently studying at UK universities, enrolled on, or about to start, courses in the coming year will see no changes to their funding status, says Jo Johnson, universities minister and brother of Leave campaign leader Boris Johnson.

In the lead up to the referendum, UK universities questioned of the impact that leaving the EU would have on higher education in Britain and shared their particular concern over changes to immigration laws, the implications of changes to EU university grants and the UK’s membership of the Erasmus student mobility programme.

How will Brexit affect higher education and research?

“We understand that there will be questions about how the referendum result affects higher education and research,” said Mr Johnson in a statement this week following Britain’s majority vote to leave the European Union.

“Many of these questions will need to be considered as part of wider discussion about the UK’s future relationship with the EU, but where we can provide further information, we will do so. The UK remains a member of the EU, and we continue to meet our obligations and receive relevant funding.”

Will EU students continue to receive funding in the UK?

As members of the European Union, the UK is obliged to offer the same financial support to EU students studying in the UK as is offered to UK nationals. Mr Johnson confirmed in his statement that EU students, who are eligible under current rules to receive loans and grants from the Student Loans Company, will continue to do so for courses they are currently enrolled on or about to start this coming year.

The Student Loans Company, which administers student loans for UK and qualifying EU students sets out the eligibility criteria in detail.

Mr Johnson went on to explain that the future of student funding arrangements with the EU will be determined as part of the UK’s discussions on its membership.

Will EU student visa status change following Brexit?

Jo Johnson reassured EU students this week that there would be “no immediate change” to the circumstances of either British citizens studying in the EU, or European citizens studying in Britain.

“For students, visitors, businesses and entrepreneurs who are already in the UK or who wish to come here, there will be no immediate change to our visa policies,” Mr Johnson confirmed.

How will the Erasmus programme be affected post-Brexit?

It is still not clear what will happen in the long-term to the Erasmus programme, which offers academic exchange opportunities for students from within the European Union. More than 15,000 students from the UK participated in the programme in 2013-14 demonstrating the global outlook of many of the UK’s domestic students.

“The referendum result does not affect students studying in the EU, beneficiaries of Erasmus+ or those considering applying in 2017,” said Mr Johnson. The UK’s future access to the Erasmus+ programme will be determined as a part of wider discussions with the EU, according to Mr Johnson’s statement.

“More broadly, existing UK students studying in the EU, and those looking to start in the next academic year will continue to be subject to current arrangements,” he said.

“There are obviously big discussions to be had with our European partners, and I look forward to working with the sector to ensure its voice is fully represented and that it continues to go from strength to strength.”

Russell Group highlights value of EU higher education funding

However, Dr Wendy Piatt, Director General of the Russell Group, has not been so optimistic.

“Leaving the European Union creates significant uncertainty for our leading universities,” she said in a statement following the announcement of the referendum result.

However taking a more conciliatory tone, Dr Piatt vowed to work together with the government to secure the best results for students and higher education institutions within the group.

“Throughout the campaign both sides acknowledged the value of EU funding to our universities,” she said, “and we will be seeking assurances from the government that this will be replaced and sustained long term.”

“The UK has not yet left the EU so it is important that our staff and students from other member countries understand that there will be no immediate impact on their status at our universities.”

Dr Piatt believes that the free movement of talent and research networks across the EU have played a crucial role in the success of Russell Group universities and explains that she will be working closely with the government to secure the best deal as negotiations move forward.

http://www.relocatemagazine.com/education-no-immediate-change-to-eu-student-visa-policy-after-brexit-says-johnson

 

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Pensions, Pensioners, Brexit and pensions’ passporting throughout Europe

Pensions, Pensioners, Brexit and pensions’ portability throughout Europe

http://www.maltaway.com/malta-retirement-programme-en/

http://www.maltaway.com/pensioni-pensionati-italia-malta-estero/

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From expatforum

British expats living in European Union countries, especially popular ones such as France and Spain, are still trying to come to terms with how Brexit will affect their finances and living plans.

One big area of concern are pensions and Brexit could be a trigger for more people to move their British pensions out of the UK, according to finance experts.

The issue revolves around whether or not the UK tax authority, HMRC, will continue to recognise Qualifying Recognised Overseas Pension Scheme, or QROPS, which have been popular for expats worried about currency fluctuations.

Brexit will be a trigger for even more people to move their British pensions out of the UK, according to Nigel Green, chief executive of independent financial advisory firm, deVere Group.

‘As the reality of what a Leave result in the EU referendum means for personal finances sinks in, people will now be reassessing their retirement planning strategy. We can fully expect demand for HMRC-recognised overseas pension transfers to be further boosted thanks to the UK’s decision to leave the European Union,’ he said.

‘Due to the huge amount of uncertainty that’s created, more and more people who are eligible to do so, that’s to say expats and those who are considering retiring outside Britain, will be seeking to safeguard their retirement funds by transferring them into a secure, regulated, English speaking jurisdiction outside the UK,’ he added.

The main concern for finances has been the significant fall in the pound following the referendum decision. For those living in the EU and in receipt of a UK pension, a plummeting pound has serious consequences as the cost of living becomes more expensive.

An established way to help mitigate these problems of currency fluctuations, which can seriously erode retirement income, is to transfer a UK pension into a QROPS. However, there have been some questions raised over the legalities of QROPS due to the Brexit decision.

‘QROPS started under EU law, but now there are separate agreements in place between the UK and individual jurisdictions, such as Malta, regarding pensions transfers. This means that when the UK leaves the EU, these agreements will remain intact.

Therefore, the pension funds established in these jurisdictions will still meet the criteria to be recognised as Overseas Pensions Schemes under UK legislation,’ Green pointed out.

‘Considering the wider post-Brexit vote scenario we are facing, we can assume that the wider international financial advisory sector is about to enter a phase of enormous activity and growth,’ he added.

Pensioners are the biggest group of British expats in Europe, and they can use the years they have worked in one member state to qualify for pensions in another. For example, in Germany EU citizens can count years worked elsewhere to meet the minimum requirements for a pension.

MALTAway, Corporate & Assets Governance, World Class, MALTA, Worldwide

We believe that many Corporations and Individuals  seek what we have found , and we want to share , we need only starting to think and act differently … and our contribution 

MALTAway is a web portal driven by an holistic vision to offer integrated services such as Corporate Services, Tax & Legal, Management Consulting, Governance, Investment, Business Advisory,  Relocation, in favor of the Corporations, Business, Finance, HNWIs;

MALTA is the best place to move in, with an Anglo-Saxon Business Culture and Regulatory environment in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, to prosper, develop and protect the Business and the Assets of a Corporation and HNWIs as well

MALTA casa e mercato immobiliare, confronto con Europa e Italia

MALTA casa e mercato immobiliare, confronto con Europa e Italia

 

 

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Questi sono i dati pubblicati ieri 12 Luglio 2016 da Eurostat

MALTA, notizie molto positive da Eurostat, dopo un 2015 con un mercato immobiliare in tensione per la forte crescita di domanda da investimenti, l’arcipelago vede il 1Q 2016 in raffreddamento con un -2,8% rispetto al 4Q del 2015, mentre se il dato viene confrontato con lo stesso Trimestre del 2015 (1Q) vediamo una crescita del +2,6%, rispetto a un dato EU medio del +3%….quindi stabilità in graduale crescita, il meglio per qualunque assets

maltaway House_Price_Index malta europe 1Q 2016

Inoltre , confrontando il dato HPI (house price index) deflazionato, vediamo chiaramente dove in Europa si presenta una bolla immobiliare, Svezia, Ungheria, Irlanda, Estonia, Danimarca, UK…. e dove i dati sono negativi come in Grecia, Latvia, Italia, Croazia, Francia, Finlandia

maltaway Annual_deflated_HPI_2015

MALTAway e CASAMALTA, sono a tua disposizione per la ricerca e advisory sulle migliori opportunità di investimento e abitative

 Una casa o un ufficio a Malta sono oggi di ancor maggiore interesse, sia vedendo questi dati, sia in relazione al potenziale Brexit, che vede molti HQ di aziende e corporations, alla ricerca di valide alternative a Londra per la sede dei propri uffici e per relocare i propri Executives…qui a Malta i costi comparati con le capitali Europee sono di grande interesse sia per investimento sia per il prezzo degli affitti per uffici e terziario
Eurostat HPI 1Q 2016
Data from first quarter of 2016 – extracted on 12 July 2016. Most recent data: Further Eurostat information, Main tables and Database. Next planned update: 12 October 2016.

This article describes the house price index (HPI) in the euro area and theEuropean Union (EU), presenting data on this indicator both at European and Member State level. It also provides examples of possible use of this indicator in relation to other statistics, such as consumer price indices, rent price indices and household disposable income. Finally, a summary description of the methodology used in the compilation of the HPI is given.

The HPI shows the price changes of residential properties purchased byhouseholds (flats, detached houses, terraced houses, etc.), both newly-built and existing ones, independently of their final use and independently of their previous owners. The Member States’ HPIs are compiled by the national statistical institutes, while Eurostat calculates the euro area and EU HPIs.

UK’s woes, Malta’s deligh?

UK’s woes, Malta’s deligh?

Prime Minister Joseph Muscat has stated Malta could become the UK’s gateway to Europe and vice versa, and seize the bountiful opportunities that a Brexit could create for Malta

 

Corporate & Assets Governance, World Class, MALTA, Worldwide

MALTAway is a web portal driven by an holistic vision to offer integrated services such as Corporate Services, Tax & Legal, Management Consulting, Governance, Investment, Business Advisory,  Relocation, in favor of the Corporations, Business, Finance, HNWIs;

MALTA is the best place to move in, with an Anglo-Saxon Business Culture and Regulatory environment in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, to prosper, develop and protect the Business and the Assets of a Corporation and HNWIs as well

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The UK’s exit from the European Union could prove to be extremely beneficial for Malta, while Brexit risks costing the City of London billions of pounds, thousands of workers and its spot as the world’s top financial centre.

This possible lost status hinges on one simple process that Malta could take over from the UK: passporting.

Passporting allows British-based financial institutions such as banks, fund managers and insurers to seamlessly sell their services across the 28 EU nations without having to get regulator approval or set up subsidiaries in each member state.

And in the immediate wake of the “leave” vote, the governor of France’s Central Bank fuelled the fears for London’s lost financial hub status.

François Villeroy de Galhau said that keeping the so-called “passport” would not be possible if the UK left the single market of trade in goods and services.

Passporting has proven extremely popular in the UK, where banks use it to expand their customer base in the union, while EU firms use it to tap into the international financial markets via London, as a global financial hub.

Non-UK and non-EU banks use passporting as a financial springboard to do business with the entire EU, with the benefit of only having to set up a base in one place.

Swiss and US banks, for example, use London for easy access to the European single market.

And given passporting is of vital importance, then it will mean a shake-up for the sector, and one would expect non-UK firms currently based there to relocate some or all of their operations to within the single market.

Enter Malta.

Following the Brexit vote, many – including prime minister Joseph Muscat – have indicated that Malta could serve as the UK’s gateway into the EU once the country left the union.

Joe Zammit Tabona, former Maltese high commissioner to the UK, told MaltaToday that Malta should set itself up as a base where UK companies would have a foothold into the EU, providing passporting services for those companies currently headquartered in the UK and offering services in other EU countries.

Malta should seize the opportunities that the UK’s exit from the EU could create, especially within the financial services sector, but also in other sectors like manufacturing,” he said.

Zammit Tabona said it would be best for everyone involved if the UK’s exit strategy was made clear as soon as possible, to limit speculation and let companies plan future strategy.

The top 14 global investment banks operating in the UK at the moment employ between them alone more than 60,000 people.

Attracting those companies to Malta would fall under the remit of Malta Enterprise and FinanceMalta, a non-profit public-private initiative set up to promote Malta’s international business and financial centre within and outside Malta.

A spokesperson for Malta Enterprise told MaltaToday that it was guided by the government on its position on Brexit and its possible effects on those economic activities for which Malta Enterprise is responsible.

As to whether any additional incentives could be introduced to attract those companies, banks and firms that could be considering leaving the UK following the Brexit vote, Malta Enterprise said it continuously monitored what other countries were offering in terms of incentives to attract Foreign Direct Investment.

“Of course, when we devise such incentives, we comply strictly with EU State Aid regulations,” the spokesperson said.

John Huber of advisory firm John Huber & Associates, and a member on the board of governors of FinanceMalta, said that potential opportunities for Malta could develop once the UK negotiating position became clear, but insisted it was way too early for tangible forecasts.

He acknowledged that Malta could be a very attractive option for companies which would potentially choose to leave the UK once the country officially left the EU.

“Our language and legislation could prove very attractive for such companies seeking to relocate outside the UK,” he said. “And having our tax system mostly based on the UK’s is an added bonus.”

Huber also expressed concern at one possible major negative effect Brexit could have on Malta.

“Once the UK leaves the EU, Malta will have lost its strongest ally within the bloc,” he said. “I wonder how that will affect Malta?”

My hope is that Malta realises itself as an attractive stepping stone for passporting services for UK-based companies who will need access to the EU, as we currently serve for Middle East and African companies,” he said.

Huber has served as an adviser to the Maltese government and as a technical reference point in the drafting of the Malta Retirement Programme, the Global Residence Programme and The Residence Programme.

He is also a member on the board of governors at FinanceMalta. But any decision – in the City of London and in Malta – will have to wait until the UK exit strategy becomes apparent in its negotiation with the EU.

And meanwhile, some argue that the Brexit fears are overblown.

“Leave” campaigners say that quitting the union would free London from the EU’s regulatory restraints and allow the financial services industry to become more competitive.

By leaving the union, the UK could, for example, revert the cap on banking bonuses that was introduced after the financial crisis against Britain’s will.

Removing that cap and letting bonuses run high again could provide a lift to financial activity in London, offsetting some of the negative impacts.

http://www.maltatoday.com.mt/business/business_news/67006/uks_woes_maltas_delight_brexit_brings_a_mixed_bag#.V33fFJN978R

No Brexit risk for global rich

No Brexit risk for global rich

Henley chairman Christian Kalin says UK’s future with EU will do little to curb right to settlement for those seeking to buy an EU passport

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 MALTA way offers you the services of legal advisory for theresidence scheme, on the basis of the different formats required by existing rules of the Maltese Regulations, according to the different applicants subjective profiles and citizenship
We advise and assist global corporations to relocate to Malta for the company and their executives or employees, professionals, families, individuals, HNWIs and retirees as well

Are the new citizens who acquired the Maltese passport for access to the Schengen zone and the United Kingdom about to get less bang for their €650,000?

Fear not, says Christian Kalin, the brains behind the ‘citizenship-by-investment’ scheme promoted by Henley & Partners, and which Malta adopted and renamed as the Individual Investor Programme. There’s little to suggest that holders of any EU passport will find it problematic to obtain access to the UK.

London has been a draw for ‘non-doms’ – a tax status for those living in the UK but whose father or grandfather was resident in another country when they were born, allowing them to avoid paying tax on money earned outside the UK. Supporters of the tax status, introduced back in 1799 for colonial traders, say it keeps capital and ‘talent’ inside the British capital.

But citizenship specialist Christian Kalin predicts that with Brexit negotiations soon to take place with the European Council, little might change for the free movement of labour in a future association agreement with the EU.

“The UK will now simply need to decide how much it wants to separate itself from the EU, which is unlikely to restrict significantly access to the EU for UK citizens,” Kalin says, listing as an example the European Economic Area (EEA) countries – Liechtenstein, Norway and Iceland – which still get the free right of settlement, or Switzerland – his home nation – which is part of the European Free Trade Agreement but not an EEA member. “It has opted for bilateral agreements with the EU which give its citizens the same rights of settlement throughout the EU.”

EU citizenship was introduced by the Maastricht Treaty in 1992 and affords rights such as the right to free movement, settlement and employment across the EU.

“It is foreseeable that the UK will end up under an EEA-type of arrangement or acquire a status similar to Switzerland’s. In this case, a form of free right of movement and settlement would likely remain, in particular for entrepreneurs, investors and financially independent people,” Kalin says, suggesting a return for the UK to its pre-EU status, when it was a founder member of the EFTA.

Kalin says there is nothing much to worry about for those who acquired or are looking to acquire Maltese citizenship.

In the unlikely event that the right of settlement vis-à-vis the UK is terminated with Brexit, this would damage the value of British citizenship far more than that of European citizenship,” Kalin says, warning that the UK would potentially lose free access to 27 countries.

“We have no doubt that the UK will find some form of association with the EU which will, at least for financially independent citizens, continue to provide access to settle in the UK.

“Brexit will of course not impair visa free travel between the UK and the EU countries, and also have no impact on the visa policy of either the UK or the EU as this has always remained separate with the UK setting its own short-term visa policy.”

Those who seek to reap rewards on corporate passporting by luring businesses from London to Malta, may have yet to wait for drastic moves.

On the corporate and investment side alone, Malta is very attractive and remains an interesting possibility for multinationals. Brexit, however… I don’t think that changes much at all. Malta is still a very good EU base, as are of course other EU jurisdictions like Dublin, Luxembourg and Frankfurt,” Kalin says.

http://www.maltatoday.com.mt/business/business_news/67114/no_brexit_risk_for_global_rich_says_citizenship_expert_chris_kalin#.V33dTpN978R

MALTA BRexit EUROPE, partner instead of compete to offer better solutions for business and individuals

MALTA BRexit EUROPE, partner instead of compete to offer better solutions for business and individuals

maltaway valletta night

Corporate & Assets Governance, World Class, MALTA, Worldwide

We believe that many Corporations and Individuals  seek what we have found , and we want to share , we need only starting to think and act differently … and our contribution 

MALTAway is a web portal driven by an holistic vision to offer integrated services such as Corporate Services, Tax & Legal, Management Consulting, Governance, Investment, Business Advisory,  Relocation, in favor of the Corporations, Business, Finance, HNWIs;

MALTA is the best place to move in, with an Anglo-Saxon Business Culture and Regulatory environment in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, to prosper, develop and protect the Business and the Assets of a Corporation and HNWIs as well

Malta was not looking for the “spoils of war” following the Brexit vote, but would offer assistance to the UK and to companies interested in using the country as a gateway to the European Union

ince the surprising decision by UK voters, a number of European financial services capitals, including Luxembourg, Paris, and Frankfurt have been actively ‘propositioning’ UK-financial services institutions in a bid to lure them away from London amid the uncertainty following the Brexit vote.

Defending Malta’s apparent lackadaisical reaction to the result – which could see it lose out to a number of European capitals that have are promoting themselves to poach investment – the prime minister insisted that Malta does not view the UK as an enemy to be exploited.

“The best results would be obtained through friendship and offering to work together with the UK … those who are going to fight for investments by stealing companies away from the UK would find short shrift in their methods.”

“While others may try to knock down the door into the UK, we want that door to be opened for us because of our behaviour,” Muscat said.

Malta had immediately provided a voice of caution even within the EU, and called for Britain to be given enough breathing space to get its house in order before pursuing exit negotiations, he explained.

The prime minister – who in the wake of the vote ruled out any Maltese referendum on leaving the EU on the basis that it would be tantamount to “suicide” – argued that though he did not agree with the UK’s decision to leave the EU, he understood why people would voted in favour of Brexit.

“I can understand why a man living in a housing estate in the UK would vote against the EU when he suddenly finds himself the only Englishman in his neighbourhood,” he said, while denouncing as “shallow” those who blamed Brexit on the elderly, poor and uneducated in Britain.

“Unless the EU understands that immigration is an issue that is close to the heart of many people and countries, more EU citizens will be turning to extreme groups and parties in greater numbers in the future,” he said.

The Prime Minister also said he sympathises with Birzebbugia and Marsa residents who frequently express concern at the number of refugees in their localities, and argued that whoever discusses migration should not be accused of being xenophobic, racist or far right.

Muscat said the EU should not have anything to do with leaders of extreme parties, but should engage in discussion those people who turn to such parties in a bid to protest against the union.

“The EU cannot remain a union of a few elite that forgets and ignores those with a humble background, dismisses pensioners or makes the young feel totally ignored,” he stressed.

http://www.maltatoday.com.mt/news/national/67091/malta_will_not_lure_companies_away_from_britain__muscat#.V3omAJN978S

MALTA. where high education combine Medsea lifestyle

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After Brexit, MALTA place 1st in computing and science graduates

In the context of a strong investment in the global market of EDUCATION, which has seen for a long time the leadership of the United Kingdom, Malta looks like the new and competitive alternative, thanks to infra-structural investments and more and more extended and qualified international community present on the island….now MALTAway offers great solutions for Individuals and Corporations as well with MBA Full & Executive & English Courses … from Brexit to MALTA to keep anglo-saxon way in EU

From MALTAwinds …. With 15% of Computing and Science graduates, Malta is technically at the top of the pile in the whole of the EU in this sector since the UK, which placed first with 17% is now no longer an EU member having voted for Brexit a week ago. Malta also registered a large share of female graduates as regards Education with 80% of graduates being women although this was just about the EU average.

Almost 5 million tertiary education students graduated in the European Union (EU) in 2014: 58% were women and 42% men.

Male dominated education fields are Engineering, manufacturing and construction (where men account for 73% of the graduates in this field) and Science, mathematics and computing (58%).

On the other hand, four out of five graduates in Education are women (80%). Another field where women are largely over represented is Health and welfare, with 75% female graduates.

One in three graduates studied social sciences, business or law

The largest share of graduates in all Member States studied Social science, business and law. In Bulgaria, this field was followed by nearly half of all graduates (49%). It accounted for a large share also in Luxembourg (46%), Cyprus (44%) and Lithuania (43%).

One in five graduates in Romania, Austria, Finland (all 21%) and Germany (20%) received their diplomas in Engineering, manufacturing and construction.

The share of graduates in Health and welfare was particularly high in Belgium (25%), where one in four graduates was in this field, and exceeded 20% also in in Sweden (23%), Denmark (21%) and Finland (20%).

Humanities and arts were popular in the United Kingdom and Italy (both 16%). In the United Kingdom, 17% graduated in Science, mathematics and computing. This field had a relatively large share also in Malta (15%) and Germany (14%). By far the largest share of Education graduates was in Luxembourg (26%).

80% of Education graduates are women

In all Member States, there were more women among tertiary education graduates than men (58% of graduates were women at EU level). The share of female graduates was particularly high in Estonia and Poland (both 66%). The most balanced gender distribution was observed in Germany (51%) and Ireland (52%).

Engineering, manufacturing, and construction is clearly dominated by men at the EU level (73% of the graduates in this field are men) and in all the Member States. The share of male graduates in this field ranged from 61% in Poland to 85% in Ireland. Science, mathematics and computing is another male field in most Member States – apart from Romania (41% of the graduates in this field are men), Portugal (43%), Cyprus (46%), Italy (47%) and Bulgaria (50%). The highest share of male graduates in Science, mathematics and computing was in Netherlands (73%), well above the EU level (58%).

Women are over represented in Education in all the Member States – their share in this field in the EU was 80% and ranged from 62% in Luxembourg to 97% in Romania. Also in Health and welfare, female graduates dominated both on the EU level (75%) and in all the Member States, with the highest share in Estonia (90%) and the lowest in Cyprus (65%).