Malta at the forefront of public sector digital strategy

Findings corroborate recent leading European surveys that place Malta at the forefront in terms of public sector digital strategy.

MALTAway is your access to MALTA digital way

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Malta has a favourable level of relative maturity in public sector digital transformation, with only 8% of respondents indicating that Malta was still in an early stage of maturity compared to an overall survey average of 26%.

The results of a Deloitte digital global survey, “The Journey to Government’s Digital Transformation”, were based on the results of a survey amongst 1,200 government officials from over 70 countries.

Presenting the report and Malta-specific findings, Raphael Aloisio, Deloitte Malta Financial Advisory Leader, said Malta had played an important part in the survey, where results paint a clear picture of national digital strategies and “corroborate recent leading European surveys that place Malta at the forefront in terms of public sector digital strategy.”

Whilst a majority of local respondents believe that digital technologies afford an opportunity to improve their organisation’s ability to respond to threats and opportunities and that their development is ahead of the private sector, only 37% believe that the level of investment in this area has increased over the past year.

Godfrey Vella, Digital Malta Governing Board Chairman and Malta Digital Champion said: “We are heartened by the fact that the results of the independent survey, undertaken by a highly respected international entity such as Deloitte, have validated our own perceptions of the achievements stemming from our Digital Malta Strategy whilst also highlighting areas which we acknowledge may require increased focus.”

Parliamentary Secretary for competitiveness José Herrera said the results clearly demonstrate the sustained investment made in digital technology.

“The majority of local respondents believe that Malta has a clear and coherent digital strategy and that digital technology will afford us the opportunity to face up to the challenges that lie ahead. An effective digital strategy goes hand in hand with Government’s initiatives to simplify public sector administrative processes, improve efficiency and reduce bureaucracy.”

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Paesi, Persone e Aziende con un più alto livello di Inglese sono più Innovativi

Paesi, Persone e Aziende con un più alto livello di Inglese sono più Innovativi

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Il processo di innovazione non è semplicemente collegato a persone con profili particolarmente brillanti, dotati  di grandi skills tecnologiche e digitali, ma soprattutto alla capacità degli individui di creare connessioni con altri, e quindi di avere accesso al network di informazioni globale dove si trovano le competenze più rilevanti, diverse ed innovative.

Un’elevata conoscenza dell’Inglese consente di avere questo accesso aperto alle informazioni e di potersi relazionare con le persone che le posseggono e le sviluppano,  l’Inglese diviene così un catalizzatore primario di un processo che si può definire di CROSS-FERTILIZATION

Come MALTAway abbiamo identificato, selezionato e costruito una risposta alle necessità di formazione linguistica per Persone, Famiglie, Studenti, Executives, managers e dipendenti delle aziende davvero attrattiva e competitiva sia rispetto ai corsi offerti in UK sia a quelli presso le scuole di moltissime città italiane.

Maltaway offre la possibilità di organizzare corsi di Inglese a Malta in un contesto che coniuga la professionalità delle scuole e la competenza dei docenti, un ambiente internazionale, prezzi competitivi con momenti di svago in un luogo di cultura, natura e mare……INGLESE con MALTAWAY 

Jack Ma, the founder of Alibaba, is one of the world’s most successful Internet entrepreneurs. But Ma has never written a line of code. He did not train as an engineer. Instead, Ma studied English in college, and worked as an English teacher and translator before diving into entrepreneurship.
That doesn’t surprise me. Ma’s bilingualism helped him work effectively across cultures and borders, and to pick up on global trends that gave him a critical edge in the 1990s as the Internet arrived in China.
When we think of innovation, we tend to think of smart, technically trained people sitting in a room coming up with game-changing ideas.

But innovation is just as much a function of connections—of a person’s or team’s ability to access global information networks and work alongside others with relevant skills.
In a global economy, English facilitates those connections.

When a country has strong English abilities, its innovation sector can better pull from the global pool of talent and ideas. And we now have data that illustrates the close relationship between innovation and English proficiency worldwide.
For the past five years we have producedthe EF English Proficiency Index, an analysis of the state of global English proficiency. Working from this data, we’ve detailed the link between a country’s English proficiency and its economic strength, and examined how companies with a common working language are better equipped to cooperate and innovate.
In our most recent report, we’ve applied that analytical lens to national metrics of innovation. We took the English proficiency scores for 70 countries, representing a sample set of nearly 1 million English language learners, and ran them against more than 800 World Development Indicators, finding high correlations between English ability and key indicators of innovation. In particular:
Countries with high English proficiency spend a significantly larger share of their GDP on research and development than those with lower English skills. Countries like Sweden, Denmark, and Slovenia have some of the world’s strongest English skills—and some of the highest investment in R&D.
These high proficiency countries also tend to have more researchers and technicians per capita.
Additionally, there’s a close correlation between a country’s English proficiency and its high-technology exports, such as computers and scientific instruments.
We see a similar pattern when we run the English proficiency scores against the 2015Global Innovation Index. The GII pulls together a number of innovation metrics and condenses them into a single score.
Of course, correlation does not equal causation. It’s important to remember that English proficiency and metrics of innovation are both correlated with other measurements of economic and social strength, such as the Human Development Index.
Still, there are some clear reasons why countries with strong English proficiency tend to thrive in the innovation sector. English skills allow innovators to read primary scientific research, form international collaborations, bring in talent from overseas, and participate in conferences. English proficiency expands the number of possible connections innovators can make with the ideas and people they need to generate original work.
It’s worth looking at some outliers in this dataset, including countries with low English proficiency but strong innovation metrics, such as China, and countries with high English proficiency but poor innovation indicators, such as Poland.
Even with strong support for R&D, low English proficiency can hamper the development of a country’s innovation sector. In China, for example, R&D expenditures are high, and the volume of published research is large. But those publications are cited much less frequentlythan original research from other countries, indicating that China is poorly integrated into the global research community.
Japan and South Korea are in a similar position. Both countries have strong metrics of innovation, with higher relative R&D expenditures, and more technicians and researchers per capita, than China. But both fall in the moderate English proficiency band of the EPI, below other countries with comparable innovation scores.
Poland, another outlier, has the opposite problem. In the past twenty years, Poland has overhauled its public education system. Today, it has one of the highest English proficiency scores in the world. But Poland has done little to promote innovation in its economy, and it has fallen behind OECD averages on nearly all metrics of innovation, including R&D expenditure, venture capital spending, and international co-authorship on research.
Recently, the Polish government allocated €10 billion of EU funding to stimulate private sector research and innovation. Combined with the country’s strong English skills, this kind of investment is well positioned to boost the country’s innovation economy.
As these outliers illustrate, English proficiency alone is not enough to drive innovation. But high expenditures on research-and-development aren’t enough, either, without the necessary tools for collaboration and cross-cultural pollination.
When they want to boost innovation, leaders and policymakers typically focus on STEM education. Investment in STEM makes a lot of sense. But there needs to be more. Our data suggests that, along with funding for research and STEM classes, leaders need to keep an eye on English skills too.
That same lesson applies for the leaders of global businesses. Boosting innovation isn’t just a matter of increasing the R&D budget. It’s also about facilitating cooperation across the company. For business leaders, that means:
Identifying and eliminating language and cultural barriers that could hinder innovation. Companies have to ensure that researchers and innovators have access to international publications, conferences, and other global networks of ideas.
Providing language training to top researchers and innovators whose English is not yet proficient so that they can consume and disseminate great ideas.
Emphasizing the importance of language and communication skills when hiring and promoting researchers and innovators.
After all, good innovators are also good communicators. Just ask Jack Ma, the English-teacher-turned-tech-magnate: for innovation in the 21st century, English is key.

https://hbr.org/2015/11/countries-with-high-english-proficiency-are-more-innovative

How Singapore Became an Entrepreneurial Hub and WHY MALTA is doing the same play – Malta, the city-state hub for innovation and entrepreneurship in the Mediterranean Sea

How Singapore Became an Entrepreneurial Hub and WHY MALTA is doing the same play – Malta, the city-state hub for innovation and entrepreneurship in the Mediterranean Sea

A hospitable environment, contact MALTAway for your access to Malta.

Singapore is regularly ranked as one of the easiest countries in the world in which to do business. There are rules, for sure, but they are clearly laid out and easy to follow. New companies can be set up in hours, if not minutes. Intellectual property is respected, and the rule of law is transparent. Immigration is no less a hot topic in Singapore than other countries, but Singapore makes it easy to get highly educated workers into the country, and has a specific employment pass targeting would-be entrepreneurs ……………..

https://hbr.org/2015/02/how-singapore-became-an-entrepreneurial-hub

Malta is so similar, based on the same concept with a strong Regulatory,Tech and Finance infrastructure and qualified skills coming form everywhere in the world and with a dedicated plan driven by MITA the Maltese Information Technology Government agency

The MITA Innovation Hub will serve as a venue where future web entrepreneurs and innovators will have a number of software and cloud technologies, and support programmes, to choose from for their projects. These include HP’s CloudSystem and HP LIFE Centre eLearning for Entrepreneurs, Microsoft’s Windows Azure and BizSpark Program, and IBM’s Global Entrepreneur Program comprising software, learning material, and access to technical and business mentorship.

The Innovation Hub plans to collaborate with other existing start-up initiatives such as the University of Malta’s Centre for Entrepreneurship & Business Incubation (CEBI) and their recently launched TAKEOFF incubator, the Microsoft Innovation Centre at SkyParks Business Centre, PwC’s 1Million Euro Startup Fund initiative and the Malta College of Arts Science and Technology (MCAST) that have recently been assigned a number of units at the Kordin Business Incubation Centre managed by Malta Enterprise.

http://mitainnovationhub.gov.mt/en/Pages/home.aspx

malta way malta innovation entrepreneural hub

How Singapore Became an Entrepreneurial Hub and WHY MALTA is doing the same play – Malta, the city-state hub for innovation and entrepreneurship in the Mediterranean Sea

How Singapore Became an Entrepreneurial Hub and WHY MALTA is doing the same play – Malta, the city-state hub for innovation and entrepreneurship in the Mediterranean Sea

A hospitable environment, contact MALTAway to your access to Malta.

Singapore is regularly ranked as one of the easiest countries in the world in which to do business. There are rules, for sure, but they are clearly laid out and easy to follow. New companies can be set up in hours, if not minutes. Intellectual property is respected, and the rule of law is transparent. Immigration is no less a hot topic in Singapore than other countries, but Singapore makes it easy to get highly educated workers into the country, and has a specific employment pass targeting would-be entrepreneurs.

https://hbr.org/2015/02/how-singapore-became-an-entrepreneurial-hub

Malta is so similar, based on the same concept with a strong Regulatory,Tech and Finance infrastructure and qualified skills coming form everywhere in the world and with a dedicated plan driven by MITA the Maltese Information Technology Government agency

The MITA Innovation Hub will serve as a venue where future web entrepreneurs and innovators will have a number of software and cloud technologies, and support programmes, to choose from for their projects. These include HP’s CloudSystem and HP LIFE Centre eLearning for Entrepreneurs, Microsoft’s Windows Azure and BizSpark Program, and IBM’s Global Entrepreneur Program comprising software, learning material, and access to technical and business mentorship.

The Innovation Hub plans to collaborate with other existing start-up initiatives such as the University of Malta’s Centre for Entrepreneurship & Business Incubation (CEBI) and their recently launched TAKEOFF incubator, the Microsoft Innovation Centre at SkyParks Business Centre, PwC’s 1Million Euro Startup Fund initiative and the Malta College of Arts Science and Technology (MCAST) that have recently been assigned a number of units at the Kordin Business Incubation Centre managed by Malta Enterprise.

http://mitainnovationhub.gov.mt/en/Pages/home.aspx

malta way malta innovation entrepreneural hub

That’is the way … where Governance & Investments match Innovation & Change. Think different to act different

That’is the way … where Governance & Investments match Innovation & Change

Think different to act different

Surfer Switches Surfboards In The Middle Of Riding A Wave

 

FINANCE INNOVATION; Lending Club is better than a lot of banks. That’s partly because the peer-to-peer lending company isn’t subject to the same regulations.

Lending Club is better than a lot of banks. That’s partly because the peer-to-peer lending company isn’t subject to the same regulations.

How it works:

  1. You want a loan.
  2. You got to Lending Club’s website and fill out a form with, like, your name and how much money you want and why.1
  3. I have some extra money.
  4. I go to Lending Club’s website and open an account.
  5. I browse the borrowers and think you look like a likely candidate.
  6. I lend you money.
  7. Lending Club sets up the loan, collects payments from you, keeps an eye on things generally, and takes a fee for its trouble.

But where are some differences:

  • Lending Club’s assets and liabilities are perfectly matched induration: Those notes and certificates mature when the corresponding loans mature. A bank, on the other hand, is in the business of borrowing short to lend long.
  • Lending Club’s assets and liabilities are perfectly matched in loss bearing: Every dollar that a borrower doesn’t pay back to Lending Club is a dollar that Lending Club doesn’t pay back to note holders. The note holders know going in that they bear the entire risk of loss on the underlying loans. A bank depositor expects to get her money back even if the bank makes some bad mortgage loans.

http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2014-08-27/lending-club-can-be-a-better-bank-than-the-banks