Just a bike for a better world, for a better governance, in Malta as well

Just a bike for a better world, for a better governance, in Malta as well

“No single raindrop ever feels like it is responsible for the flood.”

This old & futuristic machine kills fascists, fat, and bankers

A Governance based on bikes…..

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The bicycle is an amazing piece of technology that is capable of solving at least a few of our modern day health, environmental, and energy problems. Consider that in many parts of the world where bicycles are the norm there is usually far less obesity, debt, and reliance on imported oil and the big offensive military that is required to invade nations and murder the people so we may take their oil.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-11-06/machine-kills-fat-fascist-bankers

“No single raindrop ever feels like it is responsible for the flood.”

bike_ride_woman

 Speaking of raindrops, one of my favorite movies of all time is Butch Cassidy and The Sundance KidThe bicycle scene with Butch and Etta is unforgettable.  Like many, I grew up riding a bike.  I learned at a young age how to fix a flat and put on the chain.  I loved the freedom of riding around town.  My first stitches, five in the chin, were earned in a bike wreck that was caused by me.  Consequences are such a powerful thing.

Sadly, kids these days tend to text their friends, or chat virtually inside an x-box game, rather than ride over to each other’s home.

The bicycle is an amazing piece of technology that is capable of solving at least a few of our modern day health, financial, and energy problems.  Consider that in many parts of the world where bicycles are the norm there is usually far less obesity, debt, and reliance on imported oil and the offensive war machine that is required to invade nations and murder people so that we may take their oil.

Bicycles are elegant…

Bicycles are efficient…

Bicycles are effective…

When widely adopted, bicycles can have a big effect on a population.

While Europe is getting fatter, the Netherlands is getting thinner. It’s the only country in which the World Health Organization (WHO) is predicting a decline in obesity rates.

One reason, possibly the main reason, the Dutch are not getting more obese is bicycles:

In the Netherlands 27% of all trips and 25% of trips to work are made by bike. The average distance cycled per person per day is 2.5 km. Holland and bicycles go together like bread and jam. Despite the recession the cycle-happy Dutch are still spending a lot of money on their bicycles – nearly 1 billion euros’ worth a year. About 1.3 million bicycles were sold in the Netherlands in 2009, at an average price of 713 euros ($1,008) each. Amsterdam (the capital and largest city of the Netherlands) is one of the most bicycle-friendly large cities in the world. It has 400 km of bike lanes and nearly 40% of all commutes in Amsterdam are done on bike.

For comparison:

In the USA only 0.9% of all trips are made by bike. The average distance cycled per person is 0.1 km.

Minneapolis, San Francisco, Portland, Denver, and Boston are consistently ranked among the top bicycle cities in the USA.  You will not find one of these five cities among the 25 fattest cities in the USA.  Houston is the fattest city in the USA, is also probably the very worst for bicycles, and was ranked second by county for gasoline consumption, just behind Los Angeles.

The economics are obvious:

How do average people afford a $33,560 car when they make $28,031 in a year?  Debt, of course!

Through early September, Wall Street firms issued nearly $70 billion in securities backed by auto loans, up 9% from the same period a year ago, according to J.P. Morgan. About $21 billion of those were backed by subprime loans to relatively risky borrowers.

Subprime car-loan originations have taken off in recent years as lenders have loosened underwriting criteria in this sector, allowing for borrowers with low, and often no, credit scores to get access to financing. During the first half of 2015, lenders gave out $56.4 billion in subprime auto loans, up 13% from the same period a year ago and up 181% from the first half of 2009, when the market for these loans bottomed out, according to credit-reporting firm Equifax Inc.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-10-22/auto-loan-market-reminds-me-wha…

In contrast, I recently bought this folding bike for less than $300.  It was made in China, which I now regret, but if you are willing to spend more than $1,000, then you can get one made in the USA.  They easily fold up in about 10 seconds to put it in the back of a car, carry it on a train, throw it in the storage under a bus, or take it up the elevator to an apartment or office.  No gasoline expense.  No insurance expense.  No parking expense.

So, if you are are sick from being overweight, tired of bombing brown people to steal their oil, and want to know something you can do about it, TODAY , that will also improve your personal financial situation, then ditch the car and ride a bike.  You will feel better, and better about yourself, and remember, no single raindrop ever feels like it is responsible for the flood.

Go Dutch!

Be well!

Peace!

You could be interested to read this article too

http://www.bikingexpert.com/75-most-bike-friendly-cities-in-the-world/

 

Urban residents shouldn’t buy cars. It’s both shockingly expensive and completely unnecessary. Urban Maltese this is for you

Urban residents shouldn’t buy cars. It’s both shockingly expensive and completely unnecessary. Urban Maltese this is for you

Bikers are growing….feed the bikers!

How much money could you save if you gave up your car? Let’s say, for the sake of argument, that the car is paid off, so your only running costs are gas, insurance, maintenance and depreciation.

Kati and Kurt Woock of Denver realized their car was costing $4,000 per year just to run. They decided to ditch the car and rely on bikes, car-sharing services, Uber and regular old car rental. The result? Well, given that Kurt was happy enough to write up the results in a blog post, you can probably guess. “The savings of not owning a car are insane,” he writes.

Which is to say that a car is almost useless in a city, where we have easy access to bike lanes, public transport and—increasingly—car-sharing schemes. But maybe you think you need a car for you out-of-town trips? Kurt has some great advice on that:

If you’re thinking of going carless, it’s tempting to fixate on trips that seem the most challenging without an engine — heading to the mountains, for example. Don’t do that. It’s discouraging. Instead, arrange all the trips you take in a year into a pyramid, with the most frequent trips (like your commute) at the bottom. Replace those trips first. Next, work your way up, replacing trips that repeat weekly, like the grocery store. Already you’ve replaced 75 percent of your car trips, which you’ll realize are only to a few different destinations. This discovery builds confidence.
And Kurt presumably had his own garage or similarly free parking space. Think about how many cars you could rent on parking costs alone. What about the convenience of hopping in the car to buy groceries? Well, a bike is great for grocery shopping if you use panniers (saddlebags), but if you don’t like that idea, there isn’t much that’s more convenient than dialing up an Uber on your smartphone. Better still, you don’t even have to park.

You could even order your boring groceries online and buy the fresh stuff daily from local stores. Imagine that. You might even rebuild your sense of community.

Outside of major cities, things are harder. Public transportation is sparse or non-existent. There are no car-sharing programs, and taking a bike down the highway isn’t something you do without some experience. But that’s fine. Rural and urban areas are quite different already. Leave the cars in the country, bus in from the ‘burbs, and cycle around the city.

Still not convinced? Unlike your car, which burns dirty gas, the engine of a bicycle runs on delicious pizza. And if you’re riding everywhere, you can eat as much as you like, which means you can also cancel that expensive gym membership.

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3048223/owning-a-car-in-a-city-is-shockingly-expensive-dont-do-it?partner=rss