Will EU student visa status change following Brexit?

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No immediate change’ to EU student visa policy after Brexit

Universities Minister, Jo Johnson has made a statement about the status of international students in the UK from the EU following Brexit.

Malta is already, Brexit or NO Brexit, a great alternative for English Courses and Higher Education and MBA courses as well, and without any Visa for the EU student

Moreover for a EU students, the advantages, in case of Brexit, will enlarge significantly on Visa, fees and funding size

We have a valid Education offer here in Malta with many English courses and MBA, contact us for any query

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Students from the EU currently studying at UK universities, enrolled on, or about to start, courses in the coming year will see no changes to their funding status, says Jo Johnson, universities minister and brother of Leave campaign leader Boris Johnson.

In the lead up to the referendum, UK universities questioned of the impact that leaving the EU would have on higher education in Britain and shared their particular concern over changes to immigration laws, the implications of changes to EU university grants and the UK’s membership of the Erasmus student mobility programme.

How will Brexit affect higher education and research?

“We understand that there will be questions about how the referendum result affects higher education and research,” said Mr Johnson in a statement this week following Britain’s majority vote to leave the European Union.

“Many of these questions will need to be considered as part of wider discussion about the UK’s future relationship with the EU, but where we can provide further information, we will do so. The UK remains a member of the EU, and we continue to meet our obligations and receive relevant funding.”

Will EU students continue to receive funding in the UK?

As members of the European Union, the UK is obliged to offer the same financial support to EU students studying in the UK as is offered to UK nationals. Mr Johnson confirmed in his statement that EU students, who are eligible under current rules to receive loans and grants from the Student Loans Company, will continue to do so for courses they are currently enrolled on or about to start this coming year.

The Student Loans Company, which administers student loans for UK and qualifying EU students sets out the eligibility criteria in detail.

Mr Johnson went on to explain that the future of student funding arrangements with the EU will be determined as part of the UK’s discussions on its membership.

Will EU student visa status change following Brexit?

Jo Johnson reassured EU students this week that there would be “no immediate change” to the circumstances of either British citizens studying in the EU, or European citizens studying in Britain.

“For students, visitors, businesses and entrepreneurs who are already in the UK or who wish to come here, there will be no immediate change to our visa policies,” Mr Johnson confirmed.

How will the Erasmus programme be affected post-Brexit?

It is still not clear what will happen in the long-term to the Erasmus programme, which offers academic exchange opportunities for students from within the European Union. More than 15,000 students from the UK participated in the programme in 2013-14 demonstrating the global outlook of many of the UK’s domestic students.

“The referendum result does not affect students studying in the EU, beneficiaries of Erasmus+ or those considering applying in 2017,” said Mr Johnson. The UK’s future access to the Erasmus+ programme will be determined as a part of wider discussions with the EU, according to Mr Johnson’s statement.

“More broadly, existing UK students studying in the EU, and those looking to start in the next academic year will continue to be subject to current arrangements,” he said.

“There are obviously big discussions to be had with our European partners, and I look forward to working with the sector to ensure its voice is fully represented and that it continues to go from strength to strength.”

Russell Group highlights value of EU higher education funding

However, Dr Wendy Piatt, Director General of the Russell Group, has not been so optimistic.

“Leaving the European Union creates significant uncertainty for our leading universities,” she said in a statement following the announcement of the referendum result.

However taking a more conciliatory tone, Dr Piatt vowed to work together with the government to secure the best results for students and higher education institutions within the group.

“Throughout the campaign both sides acknowledged the value of EU funding to our universities,” she said, “and we will be seeking assurances from the government that this will be replaced and sustained long term.”

“The UK has not yet left the EU so it is important that our staff and students from other member countries understand that there will be no immediate impact on their status at our universities.”

Dr Piatt believes that the free movement of talent and research networks across the EU have played a crucial role in the success of Russell Group universities and explains that she will be working closely with the government to secure the best deal as negotiations move forward.

http://www.relocatemagazine.com/education-no-immediate-change-to-eu-student-visa-policy-after-brexit-says-johnson

 

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MALTA. where high education combine Medsea lifestyle

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After Brexit, MALTA place 1st in computing and science graduates

In the context of a strong investment in the global market of EDUCATION, which has seen for a long time the leadership of the United Kingdom, Malta looks like the new and competitive alternative, thanks to infra-structural investments and more and more extended and qualified international community present on the island….now MALTAway offers great solutions for Individuals and Corporations as well with MBA Full & Executive & English Courses … from Brexit to MALTA to keep anglo-saxon way in EU

From MALTAwinds …. With 15% of Computing and Science graduates, Malta is technically at the top of the pile in the whole of the EU in this sector since the UK, which placed first with 17% is now no longer an EU member having voted for Brexit a week ago. Malta also registered a large share of female graduates as regards Education with 80% of graduates being women although this was just about the EU average.

Almost 5 million tertiary education students graduated in the European Union (EU) in 2014: 58% were women and 42% men.

Male dominated education fields are Engineering, manufacturing and construction (where men account for 73% of the graduates in this field) and Science, mathematics and computing (58%).

On the other hand, four out of five graduates in Education are women (80%). Another field where women are largely over represented is Health and welfare, with 75% female graduates.

One in three graduates studied social sciences, business or law

The largest share of graduates in all Member States studied Social science, business and law. In Bulgaria, this field was followed by nearly half of all graduates (49%). It accounted for a large share also in Luxembourg (46%), Cyprus (44%) and Lithuania (43%).

One in five graduates in Romania, Austria, Finland (all 21%) and Germany (20%) received their diplomas in Engineering, manufacturing and construction.

The share of graduates in Health and welfare was particularly high in Belgium (25%), where one in four graduates was in this field, and exceeded 20% also in in Sweden (23%), Denmark (21%) and Finland (20%).

Humanities and arts were popular in the United Kingdom and Italy (both 16%). In the United Kingdom, 17% graduated in Science, mathematics and computing. This field had a relatively large share also in Malta (15%) and Germany (14%). By far the largest share of Education graduates was in Luxembourg (26%).

80% of Education graduates are women

In all Member States, there were more women among tertiary education graduates than men (58% of graduates were women at EU level). The share of female graduates was particularly high in Estonia and Poland (both 66%). The most balanced gender distribution was observed in Germany (51%) and Ireland (52%).

Engineering, manufacturing, and construction is clearly dominated by men at the EU level (73% of the graduates in this field are men) and in all the Member States. The share of male graduates in this field ranged from 61% in Poland to 85% in Ireland. Science, mathematics and computing is another male field in most Member States – apart from Romania (41% of the graduates in this field are men), Portugal (43%), Cyprus (46%), Italy (47%) and Bulgaria (50%). The highest share of male graduates in Science, mathematics and computing was in Netherlands (73%), well above the EU level (58%).

Women are over represented in Education in all the Member States – their share in this field in the EU was 80% and ranged from 62% in Luxembourg to 97% in Romania. Also in Health and welfare, female graduates dominated both on the EU level (75%) and in all the Member States, with the highest share in Estonia (90%) and the lowest in Cyprus (65%).

 

MALTA, welcome to the International students

MALTA, welcome to the International students

Shrewd countries welcome students from abroad. Foolish ones block and expel them

MALTAway assist and advise you from English Courses to High School and International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) and University as well 

IBDP

 

YOUNGSTERS have long crossed borders in search of an education. More than 2,000 years ago the Roman poet Horace went to Athens to join Plato’s Academy. Oxford University admitted its first known international student, Emo of Friesland, in 1190. Today more than 4.5m students are enrolled in colleges and universities outside their own countries (see article). Their fees subsidise local students. Their ideas broaden and enliven classroom debate. Most go home with happy memories and valuable contacts, making them more likely in later life to do business with the country where they studied. Those who stay on use what they have learned to make themselves and their hosts wealthier, by finding work as doctors, engineers or in some other skilled career.

Immigration policy is hard: Europe is tying itself in knots over how many Syrian refugees to admit. But the question of whether to welcome foreign students ought to be much easier. They more than pay their way. They add to the host country’s collective brainpower. And they are easy to assimilate. Indeed, for ageing rich countries seeking to import young workers to plug skills gaps and prop up wobbly pension systems, they are ideal. A foreign graduate from a local university is likely to be well-qualified, fluent in the local lingo and at ease with local customs. Countries should be vying to attract such people.

Places with the good fortune to speak English have a gigantic head start. Australia is the leader: a quarter of its tertiary students come from abroad, a bigger share than in any other country. Education is now its biggest export, after natural resources. For a while the influx of brainy foreigners was slowed by an overvalued currency and the reputational damage from the collapse of some badly run private colleges. But recently the Australian dollar has weakened, degree mills have been shut down, visa rules have been relaxed—and foreign students have flooded back. Last year their numbers rose by 10%.

Canada, until recently an also-ran, now emulates Oz. In 2014 it set a goal of almost doubling the number of foreign students by 2022. It has streamlined visa applications and given international students the right to stay and work for up to three years after graduating. Those who want to make Canada their home have a good chance of being granted permanent residence. Its share of the market for footloose students is growing, and numbers have more than doubled in a decade.

America, by contrast, is horribly complacent. In absolute terms, it attracts the most foreign students, thanks to its size, its outstanding universities and the lure of Silicon Valley and other brainworking hotspots. But it punches far below its weight: only 5% of the students on its campuses are foreign. Its visa rules are needlessly strict and stress keeping out terrorists rather than wooing talent. It is hard for students to work, either part-time while studying or for a year or two after graduation. The government wants to extend a scheme that allows those with science and technology qualifications to stay for up to 29 months after graduating. But unions oppose it, claiming that foreign students undercut their members’ wages. One that represents high-tech workers in Washington state has filed a court challenge, seeking to have the scheme axed.

The self-harming state

Britain is even more reckless. It, too, has the huge advantages of famous universities and the English language. But its government has pledged to reduce net immigration to 100,000 people a year, and to this end it is squeezing students. Applying for a student visa has grown slower and costlier. Working part-time to pay fees is harder. And foreign students no longer have the right to stay and work for two years after graduation. Britain’s universities are losing market share: their foreign enrolments are flat even as their main rivals’ are growing strongly.

Sajid Javid, Britain’s business secretary, says the aim is to “break the link” between studying and immigration. This is precisely the wrong approach. For a country that wants to recruit talented, productive immigrants, it is hard to think of a better sifting process than a university education. Welcoming foreign students is a policy that costs less than nothing in the short term and brings huge rewards in the long term. Hence the bafflement of James Dyson, a billionaire inventor, who summed up Britain’s policy thus: “Train ’em up. Kick ’em out. It’s a bit shortsighted, isn’t it?”

http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21689545-shrewd-governments-welcome-foreign-students-stupid-ones-block-and-expel-them-train-em-up-kick?cid1=cust/ednew/n/bl/n/20160128n/owned/n/n/nwl/n/n/n/n

 

10 Reasons Why You Should Study Abroad, in Malta as well

10 Reasons Why You Should Study Abroad, in Malta as well

Ask to Maltaway for the best school and UNI fees in MALTA, local cost of living and the best way to transfer money around the world

  1. Do it while you are young and energetic, before you are tied down to one place.
  2. Meet new friends from around the world, who you can share interests with and learn new ideas from.
  3. Gain new perspectives on things you normally wouldn’t have.
  4. Instead of just visiting for a few days, you are actually living there for four months.
  5. Learn a new language and maybe pick up a few things you didn’t already know.
  6. A semester abroad looks great on a resume!
  7. Learn to be fully independent and see what you can do on your own.
  8. Immerse yourself in a totally different culture… you might really like it.
  9. Experience a different education system than your home country.
  10. Something totally different and an unforgettable experience. You will never do anything like this again in your life.

https://www.studentuniverse.com/travel-guides/study-abroad/10-reasons-why-you-should-study-abroad

 

Study compares the expat costs of a child’s education, great opportunity in MALTA

Study compares the expat costs of a child’s education, great opportunity in MALTA

A new report has balanced the costs UK expats face when deciding whether to send their children to boarding schools in Britain or to private schools in their host countries.

Ask to Maltaway for the best school and UNI fees in MALTA, local cost of living and the best way to transfer money around the world

According to a report in the Daily Telegraph, the survey by currency transfer specialists FXcompared Intelligence found that the average cost of boarding schools in Britain currently stands at £31,000 a year.

Boarding fees at the likes of Eton, Harrow and Winchester all exceed £34,000 a year, while leading day schools regularly charge more than £20,000.

By comparison, average fees at the top 50 US boarding schools stand at a little under £35,000 while private school fees for day pupils range from £13,000-£32,000.

International schools in popular expat locations such as New York, Washington, DC, and Boston, cost around £21,000 a year – the same as Switzerland – while the figure for such schools in Canada and the UAE averages around £11,000.

International schools in Hong Kong cost £16,000, while the figure is £18,000 in Singapore.

Of course, many expats in English-speaking countries, such as the US, Canada and Australasia, choose to send their children to one of the very good local, public schools.

The report quotes figures the Independent Schools Council indicating that there are more than 31,000 foreign and British students whose parents live abroad, in UK independent schools.

Some of these schools charge higher fees for overseas students, adding between eight to 25 per cent to the charges.

Daniel Webber, managing director of FXCompared, said, “There are steadily increasing numbers of pupils in the UK whose parents live overseas, part of a billion pound market for international boarders at UK schools.

“It is important that people take the time to consider how they transfer the money from abroad for school fees. Using the right methods can save around £10,000 from Years 4 to 13, meaning that a full term is basically free.”

Sara Sparling, a consultant at Anderson Education, which assists British expats place their children, said they often choose the UK because they believe the standard of education is good and it will provide stability especially in the lead up to GCSEs or A-levels.

“If your children have been living overseas for some time, they may take time to acclimatise to British culture,” she told theTelegraph.

“Boarding in the UK, particularly in the sixth form, is a popular option. Students have the opportunity to gain independence in a safe and secure environment and to adapt to life in the UK before progressing to university.”

http://www.relocatemagazine.com/articles/david-sapsted-07-d3-2015-study-compares-the-expat-costs-of-a-childs-education