Concept of Citizenship

Brexit is an opportunity to re-shape the concept of citizenship. Let’s stop treating it as a birthright, and make it more democratic

RESIDENCE IN MALTA, contact Maltaway for any advice and support for all your relocation needs … citizenship residence in malta

Somewhere in the depths of the messy and multi-directional fallout of Brexit, an interesting counter-trend is crystallizing. Even as millions of voters around the world loudly embrace slogans like “Make America Great Again” or “Vote Leave, Take Control,” the notion of fixed national citizenship has probably never faced such a moment of reshaping. What started as a referendum on political membership for the United Kingdom may be the trigger for a radical redefinition of citizenship as a concept in the near future—more like a subscription membership than a birthright.

One immediate casualty of Brexit has been the notion of lifelong citizenship, most easily observed by a dramatic surge in applications for advantageous passports from countries like Ireland—part of the British Isles but not the UK, therefore remaining in the European Union. Facing an unprecedented run on applications forms, the Irish government asked aspiring passport-swappers hoping to take advantage of Irish ancestry to maintain a European foothold to take a breath. Many young British students and professionals who have staked their bet on remaining part of, and taking advantage of, the EU as a political, social, and economic project. For these British citizens, the Brexit vote was devastating.

Likewise, there is a rising apprehension among immigrants that they may also be booted from the UK. This led to an increase in the number of EU citizens applying for British passports in the run up to the June 23rd referendum, helping to fuel a 29% increase in applicants from 2014 to 2015. UK immigration lawyers also reported seeing a rush of new clients in the weeks following the shocking result.

Nationality-jumping isn’t solely a concern for those looking to protect relationships, investments, or livelihoods, however. Some national leaders are thinking aloud about how to sweeten the pot for those considering a new and improved citizenship status.  One immediate casualty of Brexit has been the notion of lifelong citizenship. A week after the Brexit vote, one German minister suggested re-opening the prospect of dual citizenship for UK citizens, while Italian prime minister Matteo Renzi suggested British students in Italy could apply for Italian passports.

Amid all of this unrest, Europe’s first hybrid digital residency program, Estonia’s e-residency offering, also reported a jump in applicants post-referendum. Though it doesn’t currently convey any right to actually live in the Baltic state or provide other EU residency rights, it does provide the ability to digitally open a bank account, and start and run a business. Yet, many new applicants are hopeful this digital foothold will eventually become more substantial in the longer term.

Single sign-on citizens

Is a form of digital citizenship the best way forward in a post-Brexit world? Unlike, say, the collapse of the Soviet Union, which reimposed old nationalities almost overnight a quarter century ago, the UK’s referendum comes at a moment when global flows of trade, travel, and technology have laid the groundwork for new ways of thinking about, and constructing, citizenship. It’s also shaking a generation that defines itself less through a national lens than through global connections.

Younger, more mobile, more tech-enabled citizens have grown up in a period of relative border permeability. These young people tend to see themselves more as global or regional citizens first, according to various surveys done prior to the Brexit vote. Interestingly, this sentiment has been growing fastest in countries like India and China, where middle classes have most recently emerged. These middle-class, relatively wealthy digital nomads have been the target of criticism post-Brexit as having escaped the negative fallout of globalization; but the desire to attract their skills—and taxes—has pushed governments to compete to meet their needs through new visa programs and new offers of hybrid citizenship. (Correspondingly, Harun Onder, a World Bank economist who also blogs at the Brookings Institution, has posited thatcountries with older populations tend to lean more nationalistic.) Young people tend to see themselves as global or regional citizens first. 

The Brexit situation specifically sparked some novel proposals for what could best be described as “fractional citizenship,” with holders paying costs in various countries based on length of residency. Many digitally native young people in both developed and emerging markets have already been nudged into pay-as-you-go utilities. So it’s not surprising that a similar idea would surface regarding the the hard and soft services—from healthcare to infrastructure to education to security—citizenship typically ensures.

Next stop: nation-as-a-service?

Technology as a carrier for identity is not new. Borderless platforms, such as the biggest global social networks or national digital identity programs (like those of Singapore, the UK and the Netherlands) could redefine how we identify ourselves—both domestically and internationally. Already some 70-odd countries have biometric passports, which are effectively simple digital IDs with paper backups. There are already several projects afoot to develop prototypeblockchain-based passports, and at least one country in the Middle East is rumored to be looking at blockchain-based e-citizenship, according to a source close to the project.

As countries become aggressive about attracting the digitally enabled, and build out more digital services of their own, the idea of nation-as-a-service comes into sharper focus. A country defined as a platform of digital services, social and cultural values, and economic rules, looks more like the cloud-based services of Dropbox, Spotify, Gmail than the nation-state as defined in the 17th century. While national identity is still a more complex notion, how that identity moves across borders is becoming more fluid.

 Could a country offer you a range of citizenship subscription options, and bill your taxes based on “membership”? Here’s a quick thought experiment: Could a country offer you a range of citizenship subscription options, and bill your taxes based on “membership” and services used? If countries like Germany, Italy, and Estonia are willing to reconsider what constitutes citizenship just to keep up with broader global pressures of economic competitiveness and migration, what package of benefits and protections might a forward-thinking country offer economic migrants, or extend to refugees seeking assistance while residing in another country? What if tapping the benefits of a third country wasn’t only the privilege of the wealthy, but something as easy as signing up for Netflix?

Right now, a migrant has to go through the complicated process of traveling to or visiting the physical embassy of, applying to, and waiting to enter a country in which they want to resettle. This involves both complex tangles of paperwork—and now data—that creates both intended and unintended friction. As a result, we have probably millions of people around the world stalled in limbo, awaiting the possibility of gaining new protections or opportunities.

Many European politicians have spent the days since Brexit openly questioning the borders of countries, mulling the possibility ofindependent city-states, and talking about dissolving longstanding political unions. It seems inevitable, then, given the stakes for citizens from these political upheavals, that citizenship might also be ripe for disruption. The fluidity of movement that’s been quietly, expensively—and exclusively—available to the super rich for decades may be entering its moment of actual democratization, and citizenship (or many citizenships) may just be a click away.

To avoid another Brexit let’s stop treating citizenship as a birthright

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Will EU student visa status change following Brexit?

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No immediate change’ to EU student visa policy after Brexit

Universities Minister, Jo Johnson has made a statement about the status of international students in the UK from the EU following Brexit.

Malta is already, Brexit or NO Brexit, a great alternative for English Courses and Higher Education and MBA courses as well, and without any Visa for the EU student

Moreover for a EU students, the advantages, in case of Brexit, will enlarge significantly on Visa, fees and funding size

We have a valid Education offer here in Malta with many English courses and MBA, contact us for any query

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Students from the EU currently studying at UK universities, enrolled on, or about to start, courses in the coming year will see no changes to their funding status, says Jo Johnson, universities minister and brother of Leave campaign leader Boris Johnson.

In the lead up to the referendum, UK universities questioned of the impact that leaving the EU would have on higher education in Britain and shared their particular concern over changes to immigration laws, the implications of changes to EU university grants and the UK’s membership of the Erasmus student mobility programme.

How will Brexit affect higher education and research?

“We understand that there will be questions about how the referendum result affects higher education and research,” said Mr Johnson in a statement this week following Britain’s majority vote to leave the European Union.

“Many of these questions will need to be considered as part of wider discussion about the UK’s future relationship with the EU, but where we can provide further information, we will do so. The UK remains a member of the EU, and we continue to meet our obligations and receive relevant funding.”

Will EU students continue to receive funding in the UK?

As members of the European Union, the UK is obliged to offer the same financial support to EU students studying in the UK as is offered to UK nationals. Mr Johnson confirmed in his statement that EU students, who are eligible under current rules to receive loans and grants from the Student Loans Company, will continue to do so for courses they are currently enrolled on or about to start this coming year.

The Student Loans Company, which administers student loans for UK and qualifying EU students sets out the eligibility criteria in detail.

Mr Johnson went on to explain that the future of student funding arrangements with the EU will be determined as part of the UK’s discussions on its membership.

Will EU student visa status change following Brexit?

Jo Johnson reassured EU students this week that there would be “no immediate change” to the circumstances of either British citizens studying in the EU, or European citizens studying in Britain.

“For students, visitors, businesses and entrepreneurs who are already in the UK or who wish to come here, there will be no immediate change to our visa policies,” Mr Johnson confirmed.

How will the Erasmus programme be affected post-Brexit?

It is still not clear what will happen in the long-term to the Erasmus programme, which offers academic exchange opportunities for students from within the European Union. More than 15,000 students from the UK participated in the programme in 2013-14 demonstrating the global outlook of many of the UK’s domestic students.

“The referendum result does not affect students studying in the EU, beneficiaries of Erasmus+ or those considering applying in 2017,” said Mr Johnson. The UK’s future access to the Erasmus+ programme will be determined as a part of wider discussions with the EU, according to Mr Johnson’s statement.

“More broadly, existing UK students studying in the EU, and those looking to start in the next academic year will continue to be subject to current arrangements,” he said.

“There are obviously big discussions to be had with our European partners, and I look forward to working with the sector to ensure its voice is fully represented and that it continues to go from strength to strength.”

Russell Group highlights value of EU higher education funding

However, Dr Wendy Piatt, Director General of the Russell Group, has not been so optimistic.

“Leaving the European Union creates significant uncertainty for our leading universities,” she said in a statement following the announcement of the referendum result.

However taking a more conciliatory tone, Dr Piatt vowed to work together with the government to secure the best results for students and higher education institutions within the group.

“Throughout the campaign both sides acknowledged the value of EU funding to our universities,” she said, “and we will be seeking assurances from the government that this will be replaced and sustained long term.”

“The UK has not yet left the EU so it is important that our staff and students from other member countries understand that there will be no immediate impact on their status at our universities.”

Dr Piatt believes that the free movement of talent and research networks across the EU have played a crucial role in the success of Russell Group universities and explains that she will be working closely with the government to secure the best deal as negotiations move forward.

http://www.relocatemagazine.com/education-no-immediate-change-to-eu-student-visa-policy-after-brexit-says-johnson

 

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Malta’s citizenship scheme takes top spot

Malta’s citizenship scheme takes top spot

This was the second year running that Malta ranked first.

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The study put under the spotlight seven other countries that also offer a citizenship by investment programme.

“For improved visa-free travel, permanent relocation and financial security, Malta is the way to go” the report says.

Malta’s Individual Investor Programme earned a score of 73 out of 100, ahead of Cyprus and Antigua and Barbuda. The Caribbean states St Kitts and Nevis and St Lucia and Dominica were ranked penultimate and last, respectively.

Malta’s excellent reputation, splendid climate, very friendly people and low crime rate offering a great quality of life were some of the reasons for its excellent ranking, as cited by Henley & Partners. Other positive factors were the right to settlement in all 28 EU member states and visa-free travel to 168 countries including the EU, US and Canada.

The report also ranks global residence programmes, where Malta ranked in fourth place behind Portugal, Belgium and Austria in decreasing order. In this case, beneficiaries do not become citizens but acquire residence status.

Rolled out in 2013, the IIP allows wealthy individuals to a buy a Maltese passport against a payment of €650,000, a property investment of €350,000 and an additional contribution of €150,000 in government bonds.

The programme drew huge criticism amid concerns that its beneficiaries, whose names are published alongside all naturalised Maltese persons, would be shady individuals with no genuine link to the island.

Subsequently, the government was forced by the EU to introduce a residence clause whereby each applicant would need to live in Malta for a minimum of 12 months.

New 2016 Malta Residence and Visa Programme

New 2016 Malta Residence and Visa Programme

Non-EU Nationals interested in taking up permanent residence in Malta can now avail themselves of the the Malta Residence and Visa Programme. This programme follows on the success of the Malta Individual Investor (Citizenship) Programme and allows the beneficiaries together with their registered dependents to reside, settle or stay indefinitely in Malta.

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MALTA is the best place to move in, with an Anglo-Saxon Business Culture and Regulatory environment in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, to prosper, develop and protect the Business and the Assets of a Corporation and HNWIs as well

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The programme is managed by Identity Malta, whose role is to examine applications and issue certificates where all criteria required are met. Eligibility to the Malta Residence and Visa Programme requires applicants to satisfy a three-tier investment, including:

  • An initial contribution of €30,000 (non-refundable), in the manner as requested by Identity Malta
  • A Qualifying Investment  in a form determined by Identity Malta having an initial value of €250,000. This investment ought to be held for a minimum period of 5 years from the date of the issue of the Malta Residence and Visa Programme certificate;
  • Hold title to a qualifying property, be it through outright purchase or long term lease, which must be held for a minimum period of 5 years from the date of issue of the certificate.
    • Either ownership of an immovable property purchased for not less than €320,000 for property situated in Malta, or €270,000 for a property situated in Gozo or in the South of Malta; OR
    • Leasing of an immovable property for a rent of not less than €12,000 per annum in the case of property situated in Malta or €10,000 per annum in the case of property situated in Gozo or in the South of Malta.

Any individual interested in applying for this programme is required to do so through a registered approved agent or accredited person.

The application fee, due to the Authority, is set at €5,500, which is non-refundable and constitutes a part payment of the contribution.

Other general requirements for a person to be issued a certificate under the Malta Residence and Visa Programme demand that such person:

  1. Is at least 18 years of age;
  2. Is a third-country national (i.e. non-EU/EEA/Swiss);
  3. Is not a long-term resident;
  4. Is in possession of sickness insurance in respect of all risks across the whole of the European Union normally covered for Maltese nationals for himself and his dependants;
  5. Has an annual income of not less than €100,000 arising outside of Malta or in possession of capital of not less than €500,000;
  6. Commits himself to provide proof of title of a qualifying property in Malta in accordance with these regulations;
  7. Commits himself to invest in a qualifying investment;
  8. Commits himself to pay in full the contribution in terms of these regulations.
  9. Is not a person who benefits under other programmes, including;
    1. The Residents Scheme Regulations
    2. The High Net Worth Individuals – EU / EEA / Swiss Nationals Rules
    3. The Malta Retirement Programme Rules
    4. The Residence Programme Rules
    5. The Qualifying Employment in Innovation and Creativity Rules
    6. The Highly Qualified Persons Rules

The certificate issued under these regulations shall be monitored annually for the first five years and every five years thereafter.

All individuals who are beneficiaries of the Global Residence Programme shall be allowed to apply for the issuance of the certificate in terms of these regulations.

 

MALTA skilled workers, what’s next

Visa programmes to attract skilled workers?

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To compete in a global market Malta has to compete on the skilled workers as well, rewarding them to move here, taxation is just a way

The KPMG’s biennial financial services conference questions ‘what’s next?’ for Malta’s financial services industry

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The financial services industry is finding it hard to recruit skilled workers because Malta’s education is preparing “robots” and not independent thinkers, speakers taking part in a financial services conference said today.

In a day-conference at the Hilton organised by audit firm KPMG Malta, senior partner Tonio Zarb said Malta had to work harder to reach the level of sophistication of other countries in the financial services sector.

“One way of doing this is to import expertise. Innovation is closely tight to education and we need to encourage a change in our education system to produce independent thinkers, and not robots,” Zarb said.

Malta Financial Services Authority chairman Joe Bannister drew attention to the fact that, despite the complaints of the industry, very few came forward to help with training prospective workers.

He explained how last year, only 90 placements were granted down from a 120 the previous year. Bannister went on to state that students were attracted to the financial services industry because of the high salaries. He went on to warn of risks of creating a wage inflation.

One way of bridging the gap resulting from skills shortage was through the setting up of visas programmes, such as those employed by the United Kingdom, FinanceMalta chairman Kenneth Farrugia said.

The UK brought in a 20,700-a-year cap on skilled workers from outside the EU in 2011.

KPMG partner Juanita Bencini went on to suggest that the solution could be closer to home: increase female participation. 60% of University graduates are women but less than half of the full-time working population are women.

“We have to tackle the defeminisation of the workforce and we [financial services sector] should be at the centre of increasing female participation.

It’s also translated into how employers look at it,” Bencini said.

“There is a huge mismatch between what the industry wants and what comes out of university. We have not shown enough courage to ensure that this talent doesn’t drop off and we cannot afford to have them disappear of the face of the earth.”

Bencini added that what the government did with the universal provision of free childcare centres had helped a lot but the private sector needed to do something different too.

“Can we see our males working four days a week? We really need to start thinking to ensure female participation is there and this will make the industry grow,” she said.

Labour MP Charles Mangion also highlighted the country’s stability as a key attraction to investors. He noted, that the cross-party consensus that existed for years allowed the sector to flourish.

The financial services sector contributes some 12% to the country’s GDP.

http://www.maltatoday.com.mt/business/business_news/59845/financemalta_chair_suggests_visa_programmes_to_attract_skilled_workers#.Vl7N8nYvfIW

MALTA introduces a very attractive Residence and Visa Programme

MALTA introduces a very attractive Residence and Visa Programme

We have some good news for you and we are ready to advice and support you.

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Those of you who are considering taking up residence in Malta are in for a treat with the all new Malta Residence and Visa programme.

Contact us for more detailed information about the Malta Residence and Visa Programme and to advice you about the best real estate solutions in Malta and Gozo and a Qualifying Investment as well.

 

Launched in September 2015, the new programme follows on the success of the Malta Individual Investor (Citizenship) Programme and allows the beneficiaries together with their registered dependents to reside, settle or stay indefinitely in Malta.

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The programme is managed by Identity Malta, whose role is to examine applications and issue certificates where all criteria required are met. Eligibility to the Malta Residence and Visa Programme requires applicants to satisfy a three-tier investment, including:

  • An initial contribution of €30,000 (non-refundable), in the manner as requested by Identity Malta
  • A Qualifying Investment  in a form determined by Identity Malta having an initial value of €250,000. This investment ought to be held for a minimum period of 5 years from the date of the issue of the Malta Residence and Visa Programme certificate;

  • Hold title to a qualifying property, be it through outright purchase or long term lease, which must be held for a minimum period of 5 years from the date of issue of the certificate.
    • Either ownership of an immovable property purchased for not less than €320,000 for property situated in Malta, or €270,000 for a property situated in Gozo or in the South of Malta; OR
    • Leasing of an immovable property for a rent of not less than €12,000 per annum in the case of property situated in Malta or €10,000 per annum in the case of property situated in Gozo or in the South of Malta.

residency01.gif

Any individual interested in applying for this programme is required to do so through a registered approved agent or accredited person.

The application fee, due to the Authority, is set at €5,500, which is non-refundable and constitutes a part payment of the contribution.

Other general requirements for a person to be issued a certificate under the Malta Residence and Visa Programme demand that such person:

  1.  Is at least 18 years of age;
  2.  Is a third-country national (i.e. non-EU/EEA/Swiss);
  3.  Is not a long-term resident;
  4.  Is in possession of sickness insurance in respect of all risks across the whole of the European Union normally covered for Maltese nationals for himself and his dependants;
  5.  Has an annual income of not less than €100,000 arising outside of Malta or in possession of capital of not less than €500,000;
  6.  Commits himself to provide proof of title of a qualifying property in Malta in accordance with these regulations;
  7.  Commits himself to invest in a qualifying investment;
  8.  Commits himself to pay in full the contribution in terms of these regulations.
  9.  Is not a person who benefits under other programmes, including;
    • The Residents Scheme Regulations
    • The High Net Worth Individuals – EU / EEA / Swiss Nationals Rules
    • The Malta Retirement Programme Rules
    • The Residence Programme Rules
    • The Qualifying Employment in Innovation and Creativity Rules
    • The Highly Qualified Persons Rules


    The certificate issued under these regulations shall be monitored annually for the first five years and every five years thereafter.

    All individuals who are beneficiaries of the Global Residence Programme shall be allowed to apply for the issuance of the certificate in terms of these regulations.