52 Places to Go in 2016, MALTA 3° in the world

52 Places to Go in 2016, MALTA 3° in the world

It’s a big world out there, so we’ve narrowed it down for you. From ancient temples to crystalline waters, here are our top destinations to visit this year…

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MALTA cool for Europe and now for USA as well

Malta got the 3° place, it is an affordable Mediterranean playground with a superb climate, sublime beaches, megalithic temples and a distinctive crossroads culture. English is one of two official languages, but few Americans have discovered Malta’s charms. There are three inhabited islands to explore — Malta, home to buzzing Valletta, a Unesco World Heritage city of stunning limestone buildings; Gozo, more tranquil and with a dramatic coastline filled with great spots for diving; and idyllic, car-free Comino, which has one hotel and few residents. As Valletta celebrates its 450th anniversary this year, the old city has gotten some fresh touches, including a new city gate, a restored open-air opera house and a new parliament building, all designed by the renowned architect Renzo Piano. And in Malta, you can follow in the footsteps of Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt, who spent their honeymoon shooting their latest film, “By the Sea,” in Gozo, which served as a more economical, but equally romantic, stand-in for the South of France. (You may also recognize the island from “The Whale” or “The Da Vinci Code.”)

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Amazing sea, history, great global people, total security, what else for your travel experience….

find the best with CASAMALTA  for

  1. your travel,
  2. your house,
  3. your English Course

If your goal and desire is to find the best jurisdiction to relocate, work, do business, invest, protect yourself, your family, your wealth in a strong and stable country with a great financial system, ask to MALTAway,  because MALTA is the place where global skilled people are building a community and a top leadership model in the world

Benefits of Malta Trust & Foundation

Benefits of Malta Trust & Foundation

 

Wealth Management & Trusts in Malta

Since Malta’s accession to the EU in 2004, Malta has emerged as an attractive jurisdiction for the establishment of international corporate holding structures, to be used in multinational groups, owner-managed companies as well as the holding of assets for High Net Worth Individuals. Worthy of note is the fact that in the last decade Maltese legislature has been very active in the area of fiduciary obligations, specifically those resulting from the creation of trusts and foundations.

Benefits of Trusts in Malta

  • One of the few civil law jurisdictions that has developed its ow domestic trust law
  • Recognitions of trusts set up under foreign laws
  • Offering the set-up of domestic trusts and foundations
  • Legislation published in English
  • High professional standards with many accountants, bankers, lawyers, notaries and investment advisors holding overseas qualifications and having overseas experience
  • Fast-track authorisation for trustees licensed in other (approved) jurisdictions
  • English-speaking country with a pro-business government

Benefits of Wealth Management in Malta

  • EU and eurozone location
  • Multi-disciplined advisors able to adapt to the changing needs of High Net Worth Individuals (HNWIs)
  • Sound and sophisticated banking system
  • Fast-track authorisation for Professional Investor Funds (PIFs)
  • Flexible investment structures (SICAVs, trusts, partnerships, etc.)
  • A reputable stock exchange
  • One of the only civil law jurisdictions to have successfully developed a trust concept by integrating it with Roman law sources
  • Recognition of foreign trusts
  • Offering the set-up of both trusts and foundations
  • A stable macroeconomic environment

http://www.financemalta.org/sections/malta-trusts-financemalta/financemalta-wealth-management-articles/detail/8-benefits-malta-trusts-foundations

MALTA BANKS & INVESTMENTS

INVESTMENTS in Malta: The Complexity of Simplicity

Corporations, Entrepreneurs, Families, HNWIs, Individuals, with our advice and support, find in Malta a dedicated, professional and safe Banking and Finance system within legal, tax, financial regulations suitable for business environment and wealth & assets protection

These Finance Services’ solutions for Investments in Malta, meet the clients’ needs in a stable, safe and growing economy country, member of Europe and Commonwealth as well

Behind these words , there are three basic concepts :

  • wealth protection
  • asset growth
  • income from capital

From the real estate to the financial market , through sophisticated solutions for Investment Protection & Management , we can guide you on the best way to go

MALTAway allows you to find in Malta a unique investments solution that combines:

  • legal vehicles
  • low cost structure and tax
  • efficient financial instruments
  • professional advice

to protect and growth of your WEALTH and ASSET in a jurisdiction fully compliant with the OECD and Europe regulations, placing itself at the top of global stability and fiscal efficiency

 

Be aware , open a bank account in Malta as NON-RESIDENTS , is a long, demanding and selective process. We can be your Introducer and Sponsor , first checking with you that there are the conditions to proceed without wasting valuable time

Of the 22 banks authorized to conduct business in Malta , three are owned Maltese , 19 are foreign banks .

The banking system consists of the Central Bank of Malta and the ” Malta Financial Services Authority ” ( MFSA ) , an autonomous body established in 2002 legally .

The Maltese Government has launched a legislative reform aimed at transforming the island from offshore center to financial center with a high global standard of banking, financial and insurance services as well.

MALTA BANKS 

WEALTH PROTECTION, BENEFIT TRUST AND FOUNDATION

MALTA TRUST

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Malta Trust

Malta Trust

MALTAWAY offers legal advisory and an open access to a wide set of legal vehicles to protect your wealth and your asset

Means of establishment

A trust may be created unilaterally or bilaterally, by oral declaration or in writing. A unit trust must always be created in writing.

The Settlor

The settlor is the person who sets up the trust. The settlor must be of age, have full capacity to contract and a free disposition of the assets settled on trust. While imposing fiduciary obligations upon the trustee in favour of the beneficiaries, trusts do not leave the settlor with any rights in relation to the trust property – except as specifically provided for in the Trusts and Trustees Act. The Trusts and Trustees Act lists the settlor’s rights (which may be supplemented by the trust deed) as follows:

  • The settlor has the power to seek court directives as to trust validity
  • The settlor has the right to a variation of terms and revocable trusts where the Trust Deed so provides
  • In cases of trust termination, interest lapses or no existing or possible beneficiary, the trustee holds the trust property for the settlor (or his or her heirs)
  • It is the trustee’s duty to provide the settlor with information, subject to the terms of the Trust Deed.

NEW: The settlor may reserve or grant himself:

  • Any beneficial interest in the trust property
  • Any power to appoint, add or remove trustees, protectors or beneficiaries
  • Any power to appoint an investment adviser or investment manager

The Protector

The protector is typically a person who is in a trustworthy position (e.g. the family lawyer). The protector may also act as investment advisor. Subject to the trust terms, the protector typically has the power to:

  • Appoint new and/or additional trustees
  • Remove trustees
  • Require trustees to obtain the protector’s discretion (including approval) in relation to particular matters e.g. purchase /sale of trust property.

The Beneficiary

The beneficiary is the person who may benefit from the assets of the trust. All beneficiaries have to be mentioned by name or are ascertainable by class or by relationship to a person alive or dead. For instance, children not yet born or conceived may be potential beneficiaries. The rights of the beneficiary are personal and are regarded as movable property. Subject to the trust deed, the beneficiary may sell, charge or deal with his or her interest in any manner, provided that this is done in writing.

The beneficiary has the right to information from the trustee and may seek court directives regarding the validity of the trust. The beneficiary may also disclaim his or her interest, or part thereof.

NEW: all the beneficiaries who are in existence and have been ascertained, provided that none of them is interdicted or a minor, may request the trustee to terminate the trust and distribute the trust property. The new amendments preclude this rule from applying in the case of protective trusts.

Trust Deed

The Trust Deed is the instrument whereby the trust is created and includes the terms of the trust and may also be in the form of a unilateral declaration of trust. For example, a Trust Deed may provide for the addition of new beneficiaries (e.g. for unborn children) or the exclusion of a specific benefit to certain beneficiaries under conditions clearly stated in the Trust Deed.

Letter of Wishes

The settlor can guide the trustee in a separate letter of wishes on how the trustee should exercise his discretion. Depending on the relationship between the settlor and the beneficiaries, the settlor can inform the beneficiaries of this letter, however, he/she may also choose not to disclose this letter to the beneficiaries. A letter of wishes is not legally binding on the trustee, but rather constitutes general guidance on a settlor’s wishes.

Legal Form

A trust does not have its own legal personality. Trusts are not registered anywhere and there are no formalities for the annual maintenance of trusts other than statutory obligations that are imposed on trustees in the administration of trusts (for example the duty to prepare accounts).

Set-up time

There are no statutory restrictions that could delay the setting up of a trust in Malta. Therefore, the time required depends on the particular circumstances and mainly relates to the drafting of the Trust Deed.

Termination

The Malta trust has been amended to extend the permitted duration to 125 years (formerly maximum duration was 100 years), however, it can be terminated earlier if all beneficiaries acting in unison demand termination, which the trustees must accept under the conditions outlined in the Trusts and Trustees Act. With most trust deeds it is usual for the trustees also to be able to bring the trust to an end during the trust period.

Ensuring trustees’ performance

Professional trustees are licensed by the MFSA, which has also issued a code of conduct to provide guidance to trustees as to the standards required under the Trusts and Trustees Act and other financial services legislation, as well as to the best practice in the industry. Trustees must exercise their fiduciary duties prudently and competently and, subject to the terms of the trust and the provisions of the Trusts and Trustees Act, consider the rights of all beneficiaries when making decisions affecting the administration of the trust.

If a trustee fails to administer a trust in accordance with the law and the respective trust deed, the trustee is liable for such a breach and can be sued for it.

NEW: the amendments include:

  • trustees have the duty to avoid any conflicts of interests
  • upon accepting appointment, trustees are duty-bound to draw up a written inventory of the trust assets and declare it includes all the trust property of which the trustees are aware
  • trustees are obliged to keep accounts and records of their trusteeship for at least 10 years from the date of termination of the trust/trusteeship

(Excerpt from the FinanceMalta Wealth Management Sector Guide 2015-2016)

Wealth without workers, workers without wealth The digital revolution is bringing sweeping change to labour markets in both rich and poor worlds

Wealth without workers, workers without wealth

The digital revolution is bringing sweeping change to labour markets in both rich and poor worlds

In the coming years the disruption will be felt by more people in more places, for three reasons. First, the rise of machine intelligence means more workers will see their jobs threatened. The effects will be felt further up the skill ladder, as auditors, radiologists and researchers of all sorts begin competing with machines. Technology will enable some doctors or professors to be much more productive, leaving others redundant.

Second, wealth creation in the digital era has so far generated little employment. Entrepreneurs can turn their ideas into firms with huge valuations and hardly any staff. Oculus VR, a maker of virtual-reality headsets with 75 employees, was bought by Facebook earlier this year for $2 billion. With fewer than 50,000 workers each, the giants of the modern tech economy such as Google and Facebook are a small fraction of the size of the 20th century’s industrial behemoths.

Third, these shifts are now evident in emerging economies. Foxconn, long the symbol of China’s manufacturing economy, at one point employed 1.5m workers to assemble electronics for Western markets. Now, as the costs of labour rise and those of automated manufacturing fall, Foxconn is swapping workers for robots. China’s future is more Alibaba than assembly line: the e-commerce company that recently made a spectacular debut on the New York Stock Exchange employs only 20,000 people.

The answer is not regulation or a larger state. High minimum wages will simply accelerate the replacement of workers by machines. Punitive tax rates will deter entrepreneurship and scare off the skilled on whom prosperity in the digital era depends. The best thing governments can do is to raise the productivity and employability of less-skilled workers. That means getting rid of daft rules that discourage hiring, like protections which make it difficult to sack poor performers. It means better housing policy and more investment in transport, to help people work in productive cities such as London and Mumbai.

http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21621800-digital-revolution-bringing-sweeping-change-labour-markets-both-rich-and-poor?fsrc=nlw%7Chig%7C2-10-2014%7C5356c450899249e1ccb3081a%7C